1906 Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers

The complete document is shown in this single web page. You can scroll through it or use the following links to go to a particular section:

Prefaratory Memorandum (page v)
Regulations (1)
Appendices (18)

See also

The Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers for 1903, 1904 and 1905; and

Circular 523 (March 1905): Additional Grants on Account of Pupil Teachers

The text of the 1906 Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers was prepared by Derek Gillard and uploaded on 19 March 2024.


Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers
Board of Education (1906)

London: His Majesty's Stationery Office 1906
Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.


[title page]

BOARD OF EDUCATION


REGULATIONS

FOR THE

INSTRUCTION AND TRAINING

OF

PUPIL-TEACHERS


(In force from 1st August 1906)


Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty




LONDON:
PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE
BY WYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, FETTER LANE, E.C.

And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
WYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, FETTER LANE, E.C.; and
32 ABINGDON STREET, WESTMINSTER, S.W.; or
OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH; or
E. PONSONBY, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN.

1906

[Cd. 3012.]


[page iii]

CONTENTS

page
PREFATORY MEMORANDUMv

I. Conditions under which Pupil-Teachers may be employed in Public Elementary Schools
1
II. Recognition of Centres for the Instruction of Pupil-Teachers6
III. Instruction in Preparatory Classes of Boys and Girls intending to become Pupil-Teachers10
IV. Grants for Centres and Preparatory Classes12
V. Instruction of Pupil-Teachers otherwise than in Centres14
VI. General Provisions as to Grants under these Regulations16

APPENDICES
A. Examinations qualifying for Admission as Pupil-Teachers18
B. Examinations qualifying for Admission to a Training College and for Entrance upon University Courses19
C. Regulations and Syllabus for the Examination of Candidates for Admission as Pupil-Teachers, 190722
D. Regulations and Syllabus for the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate, 190726
E. Rules for the keeping of Accounts in Pupil-Teacher Centres35


[page v]

REGULATIONS FOR THE INSTRUCTION AND TRAINING OF PUPIL-TEACHERS, 1906


PREFATORY MEMORANDUM

The following revised Regulations for the instruction and training of Pupil-Teachers will come into operation on the 1st of August, 1906. The only changes made this year to which the Board think it necessary to call special attention relate to the following points:

(1) The Board propose to pay a Grant to all County Councils other than the County Council for London in aid of the travelling and other expenses of Pupil-Teachers. This Grant will be calculated at the rate of 2 upon each recognised Pupil-Teacher for whom Grant is paid under Article 24, and who is employed in a Public Elementary School within the area of the Council for the purpose of Part III of the Education Act, 1902. The first Grant on this account will be paid for the year ending on the 31st of July, 1906.

(2) Further steps have been taken by the Board during the last twelve months to secure that Training College Students shall not enter upon Courses of study leading to Examinations which form stages towards University Degrees unless they have already reached a satisfactory level of attainment in all the important subjects in which they will be called upon to give instruction as Teachers in Elementary Schools. In July, 1905, was issued a syllabus for a new Examination, to be known as the "Preliminary Examination for the Elementary School Teachers' Certificate"; and this will, in 1907 and subsequent years, replace the King's Scholarship Examination, through which many Students have in the past obtained their


[page vi]

qualification for admission to Training Colleges. By a circular (Circular 530) issued on the 19th of July, 1905, the Board announced their intention not to allow any Student entering college in and after 1907 to be prepared for a University Degree or an Examination leading thereto unless he has passed the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate with distinction in the compulsory subjects (English, History, and Geography), and also in Elementary Science, Elementary Mathematics, and two languages; or unless he has passed some other Examination which the Board may feel able to accept as an equivalent thereto. The standard required to obtain distinction in any subject in this Examination may be regarded as equivalent to that of a "Pass" (not "Distinction") in the Leaving Examination of the London University. In English and History the standard will be rather higher, and it is hoped that the development of the instruction given to Pupil-Teachers in Secondary Schools may make it possible before long similarly to raise the standard in other subjects. The Board have been asked to accept, under such conditions as may be necessary in each case in order to secure the objects of Circular 530, certain Matriculation and other Examinations conducted by Universities as equivalents to the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate with distinction in the required subjects. It has not yet proved possible to establish such a comparison of the standards of University Examinations with that of the Board's own Preliminary Examination as would make it possible to come to a final decision on these applications at the present moment; and pending a further consideration of the matter, the Board have agreed to accept certain of these Examinations provisionally as qualifying Students who enter College in 1907 to be prepared for Degree Courses. A list of these Examinations and of the conditions under which they are so provisionally accepted will be found in Appendix B II of the Regulations.

R. L. MORANT.


[page 1]

Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers

(In force from the 1st of August, 1906)


CHAPTER I

Conditions under which Pupil-Teachers may be Employed in Public Elementary Schools

1. Boys and girls who are receiving (a) Training in teaching in a Public Elementary School, together with (b) Instruction accepted by the Board under these Regulations, may be recognised as Pupil-Teachers, subject to the conditions hereafter specified.

2. Candidates for admission as Pupil-Teachers must have passed either -

(a) One of the Examinations specified in Appendix A, or -

(b) An Admission Examination held by the Board in accordance with the Regulations and Syllabus given in Appendix C, or -

(c) An Examination conducted by a Local Education Authority or by the Managers of a Pupil-Teacher Centre and approved by the Board as providing adequate tests of the fitness of the candidates for the subsequent education and training of a Pupil-Teacher.

3. Candidates for admission as Pupil-Teachers must be approved by the Board. They must be suitable in respect of character, health and freedom from personal defects, must (except in the case of a Candidate whoso parent or guardian has declared a conscientious objection to the vaccination of his child) have been vaccinated, and (in the case of girls) must be reasonably proficient in needlework.
N.B. It is desirable that no candidate should be proposed for admission as a Pupil-Teacher unless it can reasonably be expected that he will be able eventually to satisfy the Board as to his physical capacity in the manner prescribed by the Elementary School Teachers' Superannuation Rules, 1899.

[page 2]

4. The date of admission of Pupil-Teachers will in ordinary cases be the 1st of August, but Pupil-Teachers who are to receive their instruction in a Centre of which the year begins on the 1st of January may be admitted from the 1st of January. The names of candidates proposed for admission should be submitted to the Board before the 1st of July or the 1st of December as the case may be.

5. (a) Pupil-Teachers must, except as provided by Article 5(c), be not less than 16 years of age at the date of their admission.

(b) The original period for which a Pupil-Teacher is recognised will normally be two years, but a Pupil-Teacher may be recognised for one year, provided that the Board are satisfied that the candidate has shown evidence of special attainments, and that he is not less than 17 years of age at the date of admission.

(c) In schools in Rural Districts candidates between the ages of 15 and 16 may, with the special consent of the Board, be admitted for an original period of three years. After the 31st of December, 1907, this consent will not, as a rule, be given, except where it is shown to the satisfaction of the Board that it is impossible to provide for the instruction of Pupil-Teachers in a Centre recognised under Article 11.

N.B. A Rural District is a District which for the purposes of the Local Government Acts is under a Rural District Council.
(d) On and after the 1st of August, 1908, it will be required as a condition of recognition that the candidate shall be not more than 18 years of age at the date of admission.

(e) Persons who have been Pupil-Teachers may be recognised as Provisional Assistant Teachers under Schedule I E(2) of the Code for a period of one year following the termination of their original period of recognition as Pupil-Teachers.

(f) The original period of recognition of a Pupil-Teacher may, where sufficient reason is shown, be shortened with the consent of the Board by one or more complete years; but the Board will not, except as provided by Article 5(g), recognise a Pupil-Teacher for a fraction only of any year.


[page 3]

(g) (i) The recognition of any Pupil-Teacher who was originally admitted for a period ending on the 31st of December, 1906, may, if he does not pass his Leaving Examination before that date, be extended for a period ending on the 31st of March, 1907. Application for this purpose must be made before the 1st of January, 1907.

(ii) The recognition of any Pupil-Teacher who was originally admitted for a period ending on the 31st of December, 1907, may be shortened so as to end on the 31st of July, 1907, if this is necessary to enable him to be examined as a Pupil-Teacher under paragraph (1) of the Regulations for the Preliminary Examination for the Elementary School Teachers' Certificate, 1907, and if he will be eighteen years of age on the 1st of August, 1907. Application for this purpose must be made before the 1st of October, 1906.

(iii) The recognition of any Pupil-Teacher who was originally admitted for a period of three years ending on the 31st of December, 1907, may, if he does not pass his Leaving Examination before that date, be extended for a period ending on the 31st of March, 1908. Application for this purpose must be made before the 1st of January, 1908.

The provisions of Article 5(g) are intended to meet the case of Pupil-Teachers whose recognition began before the arrangements for the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate were made known, and they will not be continued in subsequent years.

6. (a) All Pupil-Teachers must be employed under written agreements, except that a Pupil-Teacher appointed by a Local Authority may be employed under a minute of the Authority.

(b) Either the Local Education Authority or the Managers of the Public Elementary School in which the Pupil-Teacher is employed must undertake by such agreement or minute that the Pupil-Teacher shall be provided with instruction in accordance with Articles 11 to 19 or Article 28(a) of these Regulations, during the period of the engagement, but the agreement or minute


[page 4]

must not bind the Pupil-Teacher to receive such instruction at any particular Centre if his parent prefers that it shall be given to him at some other available Centre recognised or eligible for recognition under Article 11 of these Regulations.

(c) The agreement or minute must not require that the Pupil-Teacher shall perform any duties unconnected with the ordinary work of the Public Elementary School in which he is employed, except so far as may be necessary to ensure that he shall receive instruction in accordance with these Regulations.

7. (a) Pupil-Teachers must, except as provided by Article 7(b), be employed and receive training in the art of teaching at a Public Elementary School during not less than 100 meetings and not more than 200 meetings in the Pupil-Teacher year (or not more than half the total number of meetings of the school in that year if that number is greater than 400).

(b) A Pupil-Teacher who is instructed in accordance with a scheme specially approved by the Board under Article 24(b) may be employed at a Public Elementary School in one year of the period for which he is recognised for not more than 275 meetings, or not more than two-thirds of the total number of meetings of the School during that year.

(c) The conditions of employment of every Pupil-Teacher must be such as to ensure that he shall have either two afternoons or one whole day in each week free from employment, in addition to the time set apart for his instruction.

8. (a) No Pupil-Teacher may be employed in any school which is not selected by an Inspector of the Board as suitable for the purpose of training Pupil-Teachers.

(b) Not more than four Pupil-Teachers will as a rule be recognised by the Board in any department, but a larger number recommended by the Inspector may be


[page 5]

recognised in any case where the Board are satisfied that the department is specially adapted for the purpose of training Pupil-Teachers.

(c) Pupil-Teachers must be trained under the supervision of the Head Teacher of the school in which they are employed, and the Head Teacher must keep registers showing the time spent by each Pupil-Teacher in this training and full records of its nature.

9. Girls are not recognised, except with the special consent of the Board, as Pupil-Teachers in a boys' school or boys in a girls' or infants' school.

10. The recognition of a Pupil-Teacher may be withdrawn at any time by the Board if any of the conditions on which he was admitted cease to be fulfilled, or if the Board are satisfied that he is not receiving instruction or training in teaching such as they can accept under these Regulations, or if the Inspector reports unfavourably on his capacity for teaching.





[page 6]

CHAPTER II

Recognition of Centres for the Instruction of Pupil-Teachers

11. (a) Where possible, the instruction of Pupil-Teachers must be given in a Pupil-Teacher Centre recognised by the Board under these Regulations. A Centre may be attached to a Secondary School, or may, with the special consent of the Board, be attached to a Higher Elementary School, or be separately established.

(b) To obtain recognition by the Board, a Centre must either be provided by the Council of a County, County Borough, Borough, or Urban District, or must have a responsible body of Governors or Managers. Some person must be appointed to act as Correspondent with the Board, and must not, except with the special approval of the Board, be a paid teacher of a Centre or of a Public Elementary School or of a Secondary School.

N.B. It will not be required, in the case of a Centre attached to a Secondary School or to a Higher Elementary School, that the two Institutions should be carried on in the same premises or under the same management, but the Board must be satisfied that the instruction is properly co-ordinated, and that arrangements are made for Pupils from the Secondary School or Higher Elementary School to pass in the ordinary course to the Centre.
12. A Centre must, unless some other arrangement has received the special consent of the Board, be open for at least five meetings each week during thirty-six or more weeks in the year. These meetings must be held after 7.30 a.m. and before 6 p.m., and the minimum duration of a meeting must be two hours. The Pupil-Teachers must attend with due regularity.

13. (a) The course of instruction for Pupil-Teachers instructed in a Centre must include English Language, Literature, and Composition, History, Geography, Mathematics (including Arithmetic), Science (including practical work), Reading and Recitation (including voice production), Drawing and Physical Exercises. Boys


[page 7]

should, as a rule, be instructed in Manual Work, girls should be instructed in Needlework, and both boys and girls should be instructed in Music. One Language other than English should, where possible, also be taken by some or all of the Pupil-Teachers, and two may be so taken with the approval of the Board. Not less than half the time available for instruction should be devoted to English, Geography, History and Languages. Where the Centre is attached to a Secondary School or a Higher Elementary School, proper provision must be made for the co-ordination of the instruction given in the two institutions.

(b) Every Pupil-Teacher in a Centre must, except with the special consent of the Board, enter for an approved Leaving Examination, which may be either the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate, or some other Examination qualifying for admission to a Training College. (See Appendix B).

The Regulations and Syllabus for the Preliminary Examination for the Elementary School Teachers' Certificate are printed as Appendix D to these Regulations. No student admitted to a Training College in 1907 or afterwards will be allowed to be prepared for an Examination forming a recognised stage towards a University Degree as part of his Course, unless he has either
(a) passed the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate and obtained in that Examination distinction in English, History and Geography and also in Elementary Mathematics, Elementary Science, and in two languages, one of which must be either Greek, Latin, French, or German; or

(b) passed some other Examination which may have been accepted by the Board for the purpose. (See Appendix B II.)

(c) Except with the approval of the Board, Pupil-Teachers must not be allowed to enter for any external Examination in secular subjects, other than their Leaving Examination.

(d) A Timetable and Syllabus must be submitted annually for the approval of the Board together with a statement of the Leaving Examination or Examinations for which the Pupil-Teachers under instruction in the Centre are to be entered. A copy of the approved Time-


[page 8]

table must be conspicuously exhibited in the Centre and must not be permanently modified without due notice to the Inspector.

(e) Registers showing the attendances of all Pupil-Teachers for instruction must be kept at the Centre in a manner approved by the Board. Systematic records of the conduct and progress of each Pupil-Teacher must also be kept.

14. (a) The Teaching Staff of the Centre must be approved by the Board and must be sufficient in numbers and qualifications to provide for each Pupil-Teacher adequate instruction in each subject of the curriculum.

(b) In the case of a Centre attended entirely by girls, the Head Teacher and at least one-half of the Permanent Staff must be women, and in the case of a Centre attended mainly by girls, at least one-half of the Permanent Staff, other than the Headmaster or Headmistress, must be women; but these rules will not be enforced in such a way as to cause hardship in the case of any Teacher who is already employed in Central Classes at the date when such Classes obtain recognition as a Centre.

(c) The Teachers may not undertake any other duties which would interfere with the efficient discharge of their duties in the Centre.

15. (a) The Centre must be efficient; must not compete unduly with any other Centre, or with a neighbouring school providing higher instruction; and, from its character and financial position, must be eligible to receive aid from public funds.

(b) A Centre, to the Managers of which grants are to be paid under these Regulations, must not be conducted for private profit or farmed out to the Head Teacher, and the scale of salary of the Teaching Staff must not be subject to variation according to the amount of grant received.

(c) The fees and any other charges made to scholars in the Centre must be approved by the Board.


[page 9]

(d) A full account of the income and expenditure of the Centre must be furnished annually and all other returns called for by the Board must be duly made.

N.B. Rules for the keeping of accounts in Centres are contained in Appendix E of these Regulations.
16. (a) The premises of the Centre must be sanitary, convenient for teaching purposes, adapted to the circumstances of the Centre, and provided with adequate equipment and appliances for the approved course of instruction.

(b) The premises of any Centre must be placed at the disposal of the Board free of charge at any reasonable time for the purpose of holding an examination.

17. (a) The year of the Centre will ordinarily be held to begin on the 1st of August and end on the 31st of July. In special cases, however, the Board will be prepared to recognise a year beginning on the 1st of January and ending on the 31st of December.

(b) The names of Pupil-Teachers who will be instructed in the Centre in any year, must, as a rule, be notified to the Board a month before the beginning of the year.

18. (a) A Centre must be open at all times to the inspection of the Board.

(b) Notice must be sent to the Inspector as soon as is possible in each case of every date on which the Centre will be closed or its ordinary work suspended.

(c) When Pupil-Teachers are instructed at a Centre at a distance from their homes, the Board must be satisfied as to the arrangements made for their supervision whilst away from home.

19. (a) No scholar shall be required, as a condition of being admitted into or remaining in the Centre as a day scholar, to attend or abstain from attending any Sunday school, place of religious worship, religious observance, or instruction in religious subjects in the Centre or elsewhere, and

(b) The times for religious worship or for any lesson on a religious subject shall be conveniently arranged for the purpose of allowing the withdrawal of any day scholar therefrom.


[page 10]

CHAPTER III

Instruction in Preparatory Classes of boys and girls intending to become Pupil-Teachers

20. (a) Where it is shown to the satisfaction of the Board that no other facilities exist for the instruction after the age of 14 of boys or girls intending to become Pupil-Teachers, Preparatory Classes attached to a Pupil-Teacher Centre or to Central Classes conducted in accordance with arrangements accepted under Article 28 may be recognised by the Board.

(b) Preparatory Classes must be open for at least nine meetings each week of not less than two hours each, held after 7.30 a.m. and before 6.0 p.m., during 36 or more weeks in the year, and must provide a suitable course of instruction during either one or two years for scholars who are intending to become Pupil-Teachers.

N.B. It will not be required, in the case of Preparatory Classes attached to a Pupil-Teacher Centre, that the two institutions should be carried on in the same premises or under the same management, but the Board must be satisfied that the instruction is properly co-ordinated, and that arrangements are made by which Pupils from the Preparatory Classes will pass in the ordinary course to the Centre.
21. Pupils receiving instruction in a Preparatory Class may not be employed in any capacity in a Public Elementary School.

22. (a) In order to be admitted to a Preparatory Class, candidates must be suitable in respect of health, character, and freedom from personal defects. A declaration must be made on their behalf that they enter the Preparatory Class with the intention of eventually becoming Pupil-Teachers, and the Board must be satisfied of their fitness to be admitted and to profit by the instruction given.


[page 11]

(b) The date of admission to a Preparatory Class will in ordinary cases be the 1st of August, but may be the 1st of January, if the class is attached to a Pupil-Teacher Centre of which the year begins on that date. Candidates must be between the ages of 14 and 16 at the date of admission, and their names must as a rule be notified to the Board not less than a month before the beginning of the year.

(c) The Board must be satisfied that the proportion of pupils taught in a Preparatory Class who become Pupil-Teachers is not unduly small. Should they not be so satisfied, they may withhold the Grant in any year, or pay it subject to a deduction under Article 32(a).

23. In other respects the provisions of Articles 11 to 19 apply to Preparatory Classes as well as to Pupil-Teacher Centres.





[page 12]

CHAPTER IV

Grants for Centres and Preparatory Classes

24. (a) A grant will be paid at one or other of the rates stated below on account of each recognised Pupil-Teacher who has received instruction in a Centre satisfying the conditions of Articles 11 to 19 for not less than 150 meetings in the year, and during that year has been employed and received training in the art of teaching at a Public Elementary School during not less than 100 meetings and not more than 200 meetings (or not more than half the total number of meetings of the school in the Pupil-Teacher Year if that number is greater than 400).

(i) For each Pupil-Teacher admitted for a period of two years the grant will be at the rate of 7 yearly.

(ii) For each Pupil-Teacher admitted for a period of three years the grant will be at the rate of 7 yearly for the second and third years of the period of recognition.

(iii) For each Pupil-Teacher admitted for a period of three years the grant will be at the rate of 4 for the first year of the period of recognition.

(b) The Board may, as part of a scheme for the instruction and training of Pupil-Teachers which has been specially approved by them, recognise instruction in a Centre for not less than 100 meetings as satisfying the requirements of Article 24(a), for the purpose of one year of the period of recognition of any Pupil-Teacher instructed under this scheme, and in such a case the Pupil-Teacher may during that year be employed at a Public Elementary School for not more than 275 meetings or not more than two thirds of the total number of meetings of the School in the year. No scheme will


[page 13]

be approved under this Article unless it provides that the Pupil-Teacher shall receive during the period of his recognition instruction at a Centre for a total period not less than is contemplated by Articles 12 and 24(a), and that he is not employed in the Public Elementary School for more than half his time during the period of his recognition taken as a whole.

25. A grant of 4 yearly will be paid for each Pupil who has made not less than 250 attendances during the year in a Preparatory Class satisfying the conditions of Articles 20 to 23. No grant will be paid under this Article for any Pupil for more than two years.

26. The grant under Articles 24 and 25 will be paid annually to the Council or Managers by whom the Centre or Preparatory Class is provided, except in the case of a Centre or Preparatory Class which does not fulfil the requirements of Article 15(b), but is aided by a Local Education Authority. In such a case the Grant will be paid to that Authority.

27. A grant will be paid to each County Council (other than the County Council for London) in aid of the general travelling and other incidental expenses of the Pupil-Teachers in their area. This grant will be calculated at the rate of 2 upon each recognised Pupil-Teacher employed in a Public Elementary School maintained by the Council, for whom grant is paid under Article 24.

The first grant on this account will be paid for the year ending on the 31st of July, 1906.




[page 14]

CHAPTER V

Instruction of Pupil-Teachers otherwise than in Centres

28. (a) Where it is shown to the satisfaction of the Board that it is impossible to provide for the instruction of any Pupil-Teacher in a Centre satisfying the conditions laid down in Articles 11 to 19 and Article 24, or that the instruction of any Pupil-Teacher can be better provided for in some other manner, the Board may approve such arrangements for instruction in Central Classes or otherwise as appear to them to be the best possible under the circumstances. The course of instruction should as far as possible include the main subjects named in Article 13(a), and should lead up to an examination, which may be either the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate, or some other examination qualifying for admission to a Training College (see Appendix B).

(b) No arrangements will be approved under this Article unless they provide for at least 300 hours annually to be spent by the Pupil-Teacher under instruction or in private study. The time allotted to such instruction or private study must as a rule be after 7.30 a.m. and before 6 p.m. Registers showing the time spent by each Pupil-Teacher under instruction, and records of its nature must be kept.

(c) For every Pupil-Teacher who has been employed in accordance with the conditions of Article 7, and who receives continuous and satisfactory instruction in accordance with arrangements approved under this Article, a grant will be paid to the Local Education Authority responsible for maintaining the Elementary School in which the Pupil-Teacher is employed at the end of the period for which the grant is paid, or, if the Pupil-Teacher is employed in an Elementary School receiving a Parliamentary Grant under Section 15 of the Education Act, 1902, to the Managers of that


[page 15]

Elementary School. The rate of grant will be not less than 2 and not more than 5 for each Pupil-Teacher, and will be fixed by the Board for the area of each Local Education Authority as a whole after consideration of the nature of the arrangements for instruction approved under this Article. Grant will not be paid to any Local Education Authority at a higher rate than 3 unless a reasonable proportion of the Pupil-Teachers provided for by the arrangement receive some instruction in addition to that given by the Head Teachers of the Public Elementary Schools in which they are employed.





[page 16]

CHAPTER VI

General Provisions as to Grants under these Regulations

29. (a) No grants will be made under these Regulations for any boy or girl on whose account a grant under any other Regulations (with the exception of a grant in aid of a Local Science and Art Scholarship) is paid by the Board in respect of the same period.

N.B. The Regulations with regard to Local Science and Art Scholarships are printed as an Appendix to the Regulations for Secondary Schools. Pupil-Teachers are not eligible for such Scholarships.
(b) No Pupil-Teacher for whom a grant will be claimed under Article 24 of these Regulations may attend any School or Class recognised under the Regulations of the Board for Evening Schools, Technical Institutions and Schools of Art and Art Classes, except with the written consent of the Head Master or Mistress of the Pupil-Teacher Centre.

(c) No Pupil-Teacher for whom a grant will be claimed under Article 28 of these Regulations may attend any School or Class recognised under the Regulations of the Board for Evening Schools, Technical Institutions, and Schools of Art and Art Classes, unless attendance at such School or Class forms part of the arrangements for his instruction approved under Article 28(a).

30. Grants under these Regulations will, in the ordinary course, be paid for the complete year ending the 31st of July or the complete year ending the 31st of December, and will not be paid for any less period. But in the case of a Pupil-Teacher admitted from the 1st of January of any year, or instructed in a Centre of which the year begins on the 1st of January, the Board may pay proportionate grants for periods of five months or of seven months, provided that the total amount of grant paid in respect of any Pupil-Teacher does not exceed that payable under Article 24 or Article 28, and Article 31.


[page 17]

31. (a) The total period in respect of which grants are paid for any Pupil-Teacher, including any grants paid under the Codes of 1903 or previous years, will not (except as provided by Article 31(b)) exceed by more than one month the number of years for which the Pupil-Teacher was originally admitted.

(b) When the recognition of a Pupil-Teacher who was originally admitted for a period ending on the 31st of December, is continued under Article 5(g) to the 31st of March, the Board may pay a grant for fifteen months in place of the grant for the last year of the period for which the Pupil-Teacher is recognised, provided that the amount of instruction required by Article 24 or Article 28, as the case may be, is proportionately increased.

32. (a) The payment of grants under these Regulations is subject to the fulfilment of the requirements of the Regulations, but if any of the requirements have not been fulfilled or have been fulfilled during part of the year only, the Board, at their discretion, may either withhold the grants or pay them either without deduction or with such deduction as they may think fit.

(b) The decision of the Board as regards the interpretation of these Regulations is final.

33. The grants made under these Regulations are intended to supplement and not to supersede local efforts, and must be expended to the satisfaction of the Board.

34. Grants which fall due in respect of periods ending before the 1st of August, 1906, will be paid under the Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers, 1905, except that the Grant provided for by Article 27 will be paid under these Regulations.

These Regulations will come into force on the 1st of August, 1906; and except as otherwise provided the Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers for 1905 [Cd. 2607] will cease to be operative on that date.


[page 18]

APPENDIX A

LIST OF EXAMINATIONS RECOGNISED BY THE BOARD UNDER ARTICLE 2(A) AS QUALIFYING CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION AS PUPIL-TEACHERS


1 The Oxford Local Examination for Junior Students.

2. The Cambridge Local Examination for Junior Students.

3. The Lower Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board.

4. The Examination for Second Class Certificates of the College of Preceptors.

5. The Junior Certificate Examination of the Central Welsh Board.

6. The Junior Schools Examination of the University of London, if the candidate has been under regular tuition at an inspected school for at least two years.

7. The Leaving Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board.

8. Any corresponding or higher Examination approved for the purpose by the Board.




[page 19]

APPENDIX B

I

LIST OF EXAMINATIONS WHICH WILL BE ACCEPTED AS QUALIFYING STUDENTS TO BE ADMITTED TO A TRAINING COLLEGE IN 1906 AS TWO-YEAR STUDENTS OR AS THREE-YEAR STUDENTS


1. The Preliminary Examination for the Elementary School Teachers' Certificate or the King's Scholarship Examination held by the Board of Education.

2. The Senior Local Examination of the University of Oxford, provided that the candidate is placed in the pass list and satisfies the examiners in

(a) Arithmetic and English Language and Literature; in
(b) either History or Geography; and in
(c) either Mathematics, or Biology, or Chemistry, or Physics.
3. The Senior Local Examination of the University of Cambridge, provided that the candidate is placed in the pass list and satisfies the examiners in
(a) English Language and Literature (Section II); in
(b) Either History or Geography (Section III); and in
(c) either Mathematics (Section X), or in Science (Section XI or XII or XIII).
4. The London University Matriculation Examination or the School-Leaving Certificate Examination.

5. The Victoria University Preliminary Examination, or the Matriculation Examination conducted by the Joint Board representing the Universities of Manchester, Liverpool, and Yorkshire.

6. The Birmingham University Matriculation Examination and the Examination for such Senior School Certificates of the University as exempt the holders from the Matriculation Examination.

7. The University of Wales Matriculation Examination.

8. The Royal University of Ireland Matriculation Examination.

9. The School-leaving Certificate Examination of the University of Ireland.

10. The Higher Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board, provided that the candidate satisfies the examiners in

(a) One subject from Group I, which includes Latin, Greek, French, German.
(b) One subject from Group II, which includes Elementary Mathematics, Additional Mathematics.
(c) One subject not being Scripture, from Group III, which includes English, HIstory.
(d) One other subject, not being Scripture, taken from Groups I, II, III, or from Group IV which includes -
Natural Philosophy (Mechanical Division or Physical Division or Chemical Division), Physical Geography and Elementary Geology, Biology.

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11. The Senior Certificate Examination of the Central Welsh Board, if the Certificate is obtained in such and so many subjects in combination as are recognised by the University of Wales as equivalent to the Matriculation Examination of the University, that is to say, in

English Composition
English Language
History
Arithmetic
Mathematics
Latin.

and two of the following, of which not more than one may be taken from any Group -

1. Greek
2. Welsh or French or German
3. Mechanics
4. Chemistry or Botany

The University of Wales does not now require that the subjects necessary for exemption from the Matriculation Examination of that University by virtue of Central Welsh Board Certificates shall be contained in a single Certificate, nor that if divided they shall be divided in any specific proportion between the first or second or subsequent certificates.

The Board will also accept Senior Certificates of the Central Welsh Board which do not in themselves exempt the holder from the Matriculation Examination provided they are in each case supplemented by Matriculation Certificates in the further subjects required by the University.

12. The Durham University Senior Local Examination, provided that the candidate satisfies the examiners in

(i) One Foreign Language.
(ii) At least two subjects under Group B, except (a) and (b) in combination, which includes (a) English Grammar, (b) English Literature, (c) History, (d) Geography.
13. The King's Scholarship Examination held by the Scotch Education Department, if the candidate obtains a place in the first or second class.

14. Any corresponding or higher Examination approved for the purpose by the Board.

II

LIST OF EXAMINATIONS WHICH WILL BE ACCEPTED AS QUALIFYING STUDENTS ADMITTED TO A TRAINING COLLEGE IN 1907 TO BE PREPARED FOR AN EXAMINATION FORMING A RECOGNISED STAGE TOWARDS A UNIVERSITY DEGREE

1. The Preliminary Examination for the Certificate, provided that the candidate obtains in that Examination distinction in English, History, Geography, Elementary Mathematics, Elementary Science, and two languages, one of which must be either Greek, Latin, French, or German.


[page 21]

2. The Senior Local Examination of the University of Oxford, provided that the candidate passes in the Examination as a whole, and satisfies the Examiners in the following subjects:

(a) Section III, History.
(b) Section IV, English Language and Literature.
(c) Section V, Geography.
(d) and (e) Sections VII-XII, two languages, of which one must be either Latin, Greek, French, or German.
(f) Section XIII, Mathematics, or Section XIV, Higher Mathematics.
(g) Section XVI, Chemistry, or Section XVII, Physics.
3. The Senior Local Examination of the University of Cambridge, provided that the candidate passes in the Examination as a whole, and satisfies the Examiners in the following subjects:
(a) Section II, English Language and Literature.
(b) Section IlI, History, Geography, etc., provided that the candidate satisfies the Examiners in one of the three historical subjects, A, B, and C, and in the geographical subject D.
(c) and (d) Sections IV-IX, two languages, provided that one is either Latin, Greek, French, or German.
(e) Section X, Mathematics.
(f) Section XI, Chemistry, or Section XII, Physics.
4. The London University Matriculation Examination or the School Leaving Certificate Examination, provided that the candidate passes in the Examination as a whole, and satisfies the Examiners in History and Geography, taken either as separate subjects, or as a single subject in combination.

5. The Matriculation Examination of the Northern Universities, provided that the candidate passes in the Examination as a whole, and satisfies the Examiners in English Literature and in Geography.

6. The Birmingham University Matriculation Examination, provided that the candidate is placed in the first division, and satisfies the Examiners in the following subjects:

(a) English Literature and History.
(b) Mathematics.
(c and d) Two languages, one of which must be either Latin, Greek, French, or German.
(e) Chemistry.
7. The University of Wales Matriculation Examination, provided that the candidate passes in all the five subjects required at the same Examination.

8. The Higher Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board, provided that the candidate satisfies the Examiners in the following subjects:

(a) Two Subjects in Group I, which includes Latin, Greek, French, German.
(b) One Subject from Group II, which includes Elementary Mathematics and Additional Mathematics.
(c) English and History (which includes Geography) from Group III.
(d) Natural Philosophy (Physical Division or Chemical Division) from Group IV.

[page 22]

APPENDIX C

REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION AS PUPIL-TEACHERS, 1907


REGULATIONS

(1) The Board of Education will hold an Examination of Candidates for admission as Pupil-Teachers on Saturday, 11th May, 1907. The papers set in this Examination will be of two grades, Senior and Junior.

(2) Candidates who pass the Admission Examination in May, 1907, will be qualified for admission as Pupil-Teachers from the 1st of August, 1907, but not from any earlier date.

(3) Candidates who will have reached the age of 16 on the 1st of August, 1907, and whose admission is desired for a period of two years from that date, should be presented in the Senior Grade. A pass in the Junior Grade will not be accepted as qualifying for admission for a period of two years, unless the candidate has received full time instruction for not less than a year in a Secondary School or Preparatory Class during the interval between the examination and the date of admission.

(4) Candidates will not be eligible for admission for a period of one year from the 1st of August, 1907, unless they have reached the age of 17 on that date. Such candidates will take the ordinary papers of the Senior Grade, but a higher standard will be required in their case than in the case of candidates for admission for a period of two years.

(5) Candidates who will be between the ages of 15 and 16 on the 1st of August, 1907, and whose admission is desired for a period of three years from that date, should be presented in the Junior Grade. No candidate who is over 16 on the 1st of August, 1907, will be admitted for a period of three years from that date, and no such candidate should therefore be presented in the Junior Grade.

(6) The names of all candidates for the Examination must be submitted to the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education on or before the 1st of April, 1907. The names may be submitted either directly by the candidate or through the Managers of Schools, whether Elementary or Secondary, within the area.

(7) The Inspectors of the Board will arrange with the Local Education Authorities for Elementary Education as to the centres at which the Examination can most conveniently be held. Schedules for the names of candidates will be issued to each Local Education Authority by the Board. The names of candidates will be entered on these by the Authority in triplicate and in strict alphabetical order. All three copies of each Schedule should be sent by the Authority to the Inspector not later than the 15th of April. The Inspector will subsequently report upon the success or failure of each candidate and will forward one copy of each Schedule to the Authority and another to the Board.

(8) The Examination will not as a rule be held in areas for which an alternative Examination has been approved under Article 2(c).


[page 23]

(9) The Authority may refuse to accept the name of any candidate who fails to send in his name by the date mentioned in Regulation (6) above. Candidates who, for any other reason, are obviously unsuitable may be rejected by the Authority with the consent of the Inspector.

(10) The Admission Examination is open to all suitable candidates without regard to religious belief or to previous occupation or training. It is not necessary for admission to the Examination that a candidate should have received a nomination to a Pupil-Teachership in any particular SchooL

(11) The Local Education Authority may require from the parents or guardians of any candidate a statement in writing of the desire of the candidate, if successful in the Examination, to serve as a Pupil-Teacher. But it must be understood that the Examination conducted by the Board will be merely a qualifying Examination and that success in it does not necessarily confer a right to employment as a Pupil-Teacher.

(12) The standard required for a pass in 1907 will be somewhat higher than in previous years. Every candidate will be required to pass in English and in Mathematics as well as in the Examination as a whole, but candidates will be able to pass in Mathematics without attempting any questions other than those in Arithmetic.

(13) Copies of these Regulations and of the following detailed Syllabus may be obtained by application to the Secretary, Board of Education, Whitehall, London, S.W.

I

SYLLABUS FOR SENIOR GRADE

READING

A passage from a prose work selected by the Inspector.

RECITATION

A hundred lines from a poem by some good English author.

In Welsh districts a poem by a good Welsh author may be substituted.

ENGLISH

The elements of English Grammar, including the analysis of sentences and parsing. The first elements of etymology. Paraphrase of a short passage not previously seen by the candidate. A short essay on a given subject.

A few simple questions will be set to test the general reading of candidates.

Some alternative sentences in Welsh will be set for parsing and analysis.

HISTORY

Outlines of English History from the Roman Invasion to 1603. Some alternative questions will be set on Welsh History.

GEOGRAPHY

General knowledge of the Geography of Europe (including the British Isles) and Asia.


[page 24]

MATHEMATICS

Notice to Candidates. Every candidate should be provided with a ruler graduated in inches and tenths of an inch, and in centimetres and millimetres, a small set square, a protractor, compasses furnished with a hard pencil point, and a hard pencil. Squared paper will be provided when needed.

As a rule the questions set will not involve long operations or complicated numbers. The answer to money sums will generally not be required beyond the nearest penny.

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ARITHMETIC. Candidates must understand the principles of the metric system, and should be able to decimalise money readily. The use of algebraic symbols will be permitted.

The following will be excluded:

Troy and Apothecaries Measures.
Rule for finding square and cube roots. Candidates may be asked to determine the roots of numbers that can readily be expressed as the product of squares and cubes of small numbers.
True discount.
Scales of notation.
Foreign Exchanges.
Recurring decimals.
Questions on Stocks and Shares will be of a simple character and will not involve a knowledge of brokerage.

ALGEBRA. As far as the solutions of easy quadratics involving one unknown quantity.

GEOMETRY. Candidates may present for examination either of the following courses:

COURSE A. PRACTICAL GEOMETRY. The following constructions and easy extensions of them: Bisection of angles and of straight lines. Construction of perpendiculars to straight lines. Simple cases of the construction from sufficient data of triangles and of quadrilaterals. Construction of parallels to a given straight line. Construction of angles equal to a given angle. Division of straight lines into a given number of equal parts. Construction of a triangle equal in area to a given polygon. Construction of tangents to a circle. Construction of common tangents to two circles. Construction of circumscribed, inscribed, and escribed circles of a triangle.
In cases where the validity of a construction is not obvious, Candidates may be required to indicate the reasoning by which it is justified.

Candidates will be expected to be acquainted with the forms of the cube, the rectangular block, the sphere, the cylinder, and the cone.

THEORETICAL GEOMETRY. The substance of the theorems contained in Euclid, Book I, Propositions 4-6, 8, 13-16, 18, 19, 26-30, 32-41, 43, 47, 48; and Book III, Propositions 3, 14-16, 18-22, 31. Questions upon these theorems, easy deductions from them and arithmetical illustrations will be included.

[page 25]

COURSE B. The substance of Euclid, I, II, III, with simple geometrical exercises.
All Candidates, whether they select Course A or Course B, must be prepared to find numerical answers to questions upon the areas and sides of rectangles, triangles, and circles, and upon the volumes and surfaces of rectangular blocks, prisms, cones, pyramids, and cylinders.

NEEDLEWORK (for Girls only)

No Examination in Needlework will be held, but candidates will be expected, before admission as Pupil-Teachers, to satisfy the Local Education Authority that they are reasonably proficient in this subject.

II

SYLLABUS FOR JUNIOR GRADE

READING

A passage from a prose work selected by the Inspector.

RECITATION

Seventy lines from a poem by some good English author.

In Welsh districts a poem by a good Welsh author may be substituted.

ENGLISH

The elements of English Grammar, including the analysis of easy sentences and parsing. A short essay on a given subject.

A few simple questions will be set to test the general reading of candidates.

Some alternative sentences in Welsh will be set for parsing and analysis.

HISTORY

Outlines of English History from the Roman Invasion to 1485.

Some alternative questions will be set on Welsh History.

GEOGRAPHY

Outlines of physical and political Geography of the World with fuller knowledge of the British Isles.

Some alternative questions will be set on Welsh Geography.

ARITHMETIC

Excluding Stocks, Compound Interest, Square and Cube Root, Scales of Notation, Foreign Exchanges, True Discount, Recurring Decimals, Troy Weight and Apothecaries Weight. Candidates must understand the principles of the Metric System.

NEEDLEWORK (for Girls only)

No examination in Needlework will be held, but candidates will be expected, before admission as Pupil-Teachers, to satisfy the Local Education Authority that they are reasonably proficient in this subject.


[page 26]

APPENDIX D

REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUS FOR THE PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS' CERTIFICATE, 1907


REGULATIONS

(1) The Preliminary Examination for the Elementary School Teachers' Certificate (which replaces the former King's Scholarship Examination) for the year 1907, will be divided in to two parts. All candidates must be either Pupil-Teachers, or persons not being Pupil-Teachers who will be over 18 years of age on August 1st, 1907. No Pupil-Teacher will be admitted to the examination before the beginning of the last year of his engagement. Persons employed in Elementary Schools in Scotland will not, as a rule, be admitted to the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate held in England.

(2) Part I will consist of Reading, Repetition, Penmanship, Composition, Arithmetic, Drawing, Music, and (for women) Needlework.

In Part II all candidates will be examined in (a) three Compulsory Subjects, viz.: English Language and Literature, History, and Geography, and also in (b) one Optional Subject, which may be either Elementary Mathematics, Elementary Science, or one of the following languages: Greek, Latin, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Welsh, or Hebrew.

Candidates may offer more than one of the Optional Subjects; but two only of these may be languages; and if two languages are taken, one must be either Greek, Latin, German, or French.

(3) Candidates who are recognised by the Board as Pupil-Teachers at the date of Part I. of the examination, or who, not being Pupil-Teachers, have been employed in Public Elementary Schools in some recognised capacity other than that of a monitor for not less than a year during the two years immediately preceding that date, will be credited with an allowance of marks towards the result of Part II of the examination, unless an unfavourable report upon their teaching capacity has been received from the Inspector.

(4) Part I will be taken on either Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, December 13th, 14th, and 15th, 1906, at Pupil-Teacher Centres and such other places as may be necessary. It will be open to all candidates, whether Pupil-Teachers or not, who are qualified under the conditions of Regulation (1) above, and who intend to complete their examination by taking Part II in April, 1907.

(5) Part II of the examination will be open only to candidates who have satisfied the examiners in Part I. Part I will be a qualifying test merely, and no marks for the subjects included in it will be credited towards Part II. It is not, however, intended that the test in these important subjects should be of a perfunctory character.


[page 27]

(6) Part II will be held on April 9th, 1907, and the following three days, at such places as may be necessary. Information as to these places will be given to Candidates. If the Board has arranged to hold the examination at any Training College, candidates may, with the consent of the authorities of the Training College, be examined at that College. Such Candidates must make their own arrangements with the authorities of Training Colleges.

(7) The names of candidates for the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate should be notified to the Board of Education, Whitehall, London, S.W., before October 1st, 1906. The notification must be made on Form 12 (Exam.), a stock of which will be supplied to Local Education Authorities and Managers of Pupil-Teacher Centres. The form can also be obtained on application to the Board.

As it frequently takes some time for Candidates to procure the information asked for on Form 12 (Exam.), these forms should be procured in good time.

Late applications, when some good reason is shown for the delay, may be received during October on payment of a fee of 5s.; but no application will under any circumstances be received after October 31st.

(8) Candidates who pass Part I of the examination need not make a special application for permission to attend Part II. A form admitting them to Part II will be sent to them in due course.

(9) Candidates who have not been Pupil-Teachers and who have not previously supplied a satisfactory medical certificate to the Board, must produce such a certificate on an approved Form as a condition of admission to Part II of the Examination. When necessary, such forms will be sent to the candidates for completion together with the Forms admitting them to Part II of the Examination. No candidates need obtain a medical certificate unless one of these Forms is sent for completion.

(10) Candidates who obtain a suitable aggregate of marks in Part II will be held to have passed the Examination, but for the purpose of this aggregate no marks will be counted for more than one optional subject, and if a candidate attempts more than one optional subject, the marks for that only in which he does best will be counted toward his aggregate. All candidates who pass the Examination will be regarded as qualified by Examination for recognition as Uncertificated Teachers and may be proposed by the authorities of a Training College for admission as recognised students for a two years' course of training. It will further be possible for any candidate who passes the Examination as a whole to obtain distinction in any or each of the three compulsory subjects and of four optional subjects in Part II, and such distinction will be shown by appropriate signs in the list of results. This list will give the names of all candidates who pass the Examination in alphabetical order without classification.

(11) The results of examinations for University Extension Certificates will not, in and after 1907, be accepted as substitutes for any portion of the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate.

(12) Candidates will be informed by letter from the Board of Education of the result of their examination.

(13) Arrangements will be made for a special examination in the Summer of 1907 of Blind Candidates proposing to enter a recognised Training College for the Blind.

(14) Copies of these Regulations and Syllabus may be obtained on application to the Secretary, Board of Education, Whitehall, London, S.W., or from the Local Education Authorities, to whom a supply will be sent for this purpose.


[page 28]

NOTES

(1) No student admitted to a Training College in 1907 or afterwards will be allowed to be prepared for an Examination forming a recognised stage towards a University Degree as a part of his Course, unless he has either

(a) passed the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate and obtained in that Examination distinction in English, History, and Geography and also in four optional subjects, including two languages, one of which must be either Greek, Latin, French, or German; or

(b) passed some other Examination which may have been accepted by the Board for the purpose.

(2) The standard required to pass the Preliminary Examination for the Certificate as a whole will be roughly equal to the standard which has been required to pass the King's Scholarship Examination in recent years. To obtain distinction in any subject a standard will be required which may be regarded as equivalent to that of a pass (not "distinction") in the Leaving Certificate Examination of the London University. In English and in History, however, the standard will be rather higher; and it is hoped that the development of the Pupil Teacher Centres may make it possible before long similarly to raise the standard in other subjects.





[page 29]

DETAILED SYLLABUS OF THE SUBJECTS OF EXAMINATION

Defective spelling or handwriting will be taken into account in estimating the value of a Candidate's work.

The use of rulers will not be allowed except for Mathematical questions where actual measurements are necessary.

PART I

I. Reading

To read with clear enunciation, ease, and intelligence, from a work of a standard prose author and a work of a standard poet.

II. Repetition

To repeat 100 lines of Shakespeare or some other standard English author with clearness and force, and knowledge of the meaning.

In place of 50 lines of English, candidates from Welsh districts may substitute 50 lines from a standard Welsh author.

The exercises in Reading and Repetition will be performed at the Examination Centre and not during the visits of Inspectors to Public Elementary Schools.

III. Penmanship

To set copies in large and small hand.

IV. Composition

V. Arithmetic

The Theory and Practice of Arithmetic.

The following will be excluded:

Troy and Apothecaries Measures.
The rules for finding Square and Cube roots. N.B Candidates may be asked to determine the square (or cube) roots of numbers that can readily be expressed as the product of the squares (or cubes) of small factors.
Practice.
Ratio.
Proportion except by the unitary or fractional method.
Stocks and Shares.
True Discount.
Scales of Notation.
Foreign Exchanges.
Recurring Decimals and Complicated Fractions.
The metric system will only be applied to measuring length, area, and volume.

Questions may be set on the mensuration of rectangular surfaces and solids.

The use of algebraic symbols will be permitted.

As a rule, (a) the questions will not involve long operations or complicated numbers, (b) the answers to money sums will not be required beyond the nearest penny.

The papers will be sufficiently long to allow the candidates some latitude in the questions selected, but no limit will be placed on the number of questions which may be attempted.


[page 30]

VI. Drawing

Candidates will be required to undergo a test at the discretion of the Examiner, in either (1) or (2) below.

(1) Freehand Drawing in outline.

Candidates are required to make a drawing in outline with pencil or chalk, on a half imperial sheet of paper, from diagrams of ornament, or natural foliage and flowers. The drawing must not be of the same size as the example supplied. No ruling, measuring, tracing, or use of instruments is allowed.

Candidates should have gone through a graduated series of Exercises in drawing from diagrams, and, where possible, actual specimens of ornament of good form, and of foliage and flowers from nature, with the object of cultivating a power of drawing freely and accurately, and with an appreciation of the structure, proportions, and beauty of the originals.

(2) Model and Object Drawing in outline.

Candidates are required to draw in outline with pencil or chalk, on a half imperial sheet of paper, the objects placed before them as they appear from the point of view in which candidates may be seated. No ruling, measuring, or use of instruments is allowed; but the pencil may be held between the eye and the objects for the purpose of estimating their apparent relative size. For the examination the groups will be composed of an imperial drawing board, and, placed upon it, two or more geometrical models or vases, or a simple common object or a group of objects.

Candidates should have gone through a graduated series of exercises in drawing from geometrical models, common things of simple form, etc., with the object (i) of studying their structure and character, as well as the effect of perspective in modifying the appearance of such things, and (ii) of representing them accurately and intelligently.

VII. Music

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of both the Staff and Tonic Sol-fa Notations.

(a) THEORY OF MUSIC:

Marks will be deducted for indistinct or inaccurate notation.

Staff Notation

All the major and minor scales and signatures. Diatonic and chromatic intervals. Easy transposition. The value of notes, dotted notes, and rests. Bars and time signatures. Transposition of time. Syncopation. Compass of voices. Common musical terms. Translation of a short passage into Tonic Sol-fa Notation.

Tonic Sol-fa Notation

The major and minor modes. Bridge notes and first removes of key. Chromatic names. Relative pitch of keys and notes. Diatonic and chromatic intervals. Pulses, measures. Pulse division in halves, quarters, thirds, etc. Syncopation. Compass of voices. Common musical terms. Translation of a short passage into Staff Notation.


[page 31]

(b) PRACTICAL MUSIC (in either Notation):

Graded tests in tune, time, and ear training, based upon the requirements for the various school divisions.

The highest marks will be given to candidates able to sing at sight passages combining time and tune, and to tell ear exercises freely.

(i) Candidates may take theory of music without also taking practical music.

(ii) The tests can be sung from the staff or tonic sol-fa notation at the option of the candidate, but additional credit will be given to candidates singing the tune and time tests from both notations.

(iii) Each candidate will be tested in time and one other point (note or ear).

(iv) No songs are required.

VIII. Needlework (Women only):

One of the following exercises will be set:

(a) An exercise in making or mending some part of the calico and flannel garments included in the term "underclothing";

or

(b) A test in cutting out by proportion or by given measurements one of the following garments: A chemise; an overall; or a gored petticoat.

PART II

A. COMPULSORY SUBJECTS

I. English Language and Literature

(1) English Grammar.

(2) The elements of English Composition and Literature.

Questions will be set to test such knowledge as may be derived from books like Abbott and Seeley's "English Lessons for English People".

All candidates should have undertaken as wide a course as possible of general reading, which should include, amongst other books, one or two of Shakespeare's plays, some historical novels, and an anthology of verse. It is recognised that such reading cannot be wholly tested by examination, but a large number of alternative questions will be set, some of which all candidates may reasonably expect to be able to answer.

Candidates will also be expected to write an Essay.

Opportunity will be given to show a knowledge of Welsh.

II. History

(1)-The outlines of British History, including the main landmarks of European History as they directly affect British History.

Candidates will be called upon to answer

(a) the whole of a small number of elementary questions relating to the period 1017-1870;

[page 32]

(b) a selection from a larger number of questions requiring a more advanced knowledge of some substantial part of that period. This part of the paper will be arranged in five sections, dealing with: (i) 1017-1399; (ii) 1399-1603; (iii) 1603-1714; (iv) 1714- 1815; (v) 1815-1870. Candidates will be allowed to select questions from one, more than one, or all of these sections.
Some of the questions under (a) or (b) will relate especially to Welsh History.

(2) The elements of the duties and rights of citizenship.

III. Geography. (1) The elements of general and physical geography. (2) The drawing of simple sketch maps. (3) Political and economic geography, with special reference to Europe, including the British Isles.

Some of the questions in (2) and (3) will relate to Wales.

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS

I. Languages

One or two of the following: Greek, Latin, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Welsh, Hebrew. If two languages are taken, one of them must be either Greek, Latin, German or French.

There will be no set books, but all candidates will be tested with pieces of unseen translation, and will be expected to show a knowledge of simple accidence and syntax. Opportunity will be given for showing proficiency in Prose Composition in the languages chosen.

II. Elementary Science

Candidates will be expected to show a practical knowledge of the subjects taken; they should in fact have performed the majority of the experiments themselves and the examination questions will be framed on this supposition. Every candidate, before his or her marks can be counted in any of the examinations, must present a certificate from some responsible person of having had at least 30 hours of practical work in a laboratory or elsewhere.

MEASUREMENT AND MATTER. Lengths; Areas; Volumes; Weights; British and Metric Systems; Density of Liquids; Principle of Archimedes; Specific Gravity; the U-Tube; The Barometer.

HEAT. Effects of Heat on gases, liquids and solids; Expansion; Change of State; the Thermometer; Melting Points; Boiling Points; Vapour.

CHEMISTRY. A study of the effect of heat on paper, wood, coal, feathers, starch, sugar, salt, soda, chalk, iron, copper, lead. Composition and properties of air.
The effects of simple acids on zinc and iron.
Composition and properties of water.
The action of water on metals.

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING (A, B, OR C) TO BE SELECTED BY THE CANDIDATE, IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE

A

Preparation and properties of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, carbonic acid, and ammonia.
Properties of sulphur, phosphorus, and carbon, and their simple oxides.
Action of strong sulphuric acid on water, salt, sugar, nitre.


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Action of strong nitric acid on copper.
Acids, Bases, Salts, Equivalents.
Simple practical study of petroleum, oil, fat, soap, albumen, glass, lime, clay, hard and soft water.

B

MECHANICS. Weight; Centre of Gravity; Parallelogram of Forces; Levers; Velocity; Energy and Work; Storing of Energy.

HEAT. Quantity of Heat; Specific Heat; Latent Heat; Dew Point; Transference of Heat.

LIGHT. Propagation of Light; Shadows; Photometry; Laws of Reflexion and Refraction, with reference to plane surfaces; Prisms and the Spectrum.

MAGNETISM. Magnets; the Earth as a magnet; the Magnetic Compass; Dip, Declination.

ELECTRICITY. Development of Electricity by various means, mechanical, chemical, thermal, magnetic; the effects of the Electric Current; Electro Magnets.

C

PLANT LIFE. The Life History of a moss, a fern, and a bean or pea; Nutrition; Germination; Light, heat, air, water, and soil as influences in Plant Growth; Growth of Trees.

ANIMAL LIFE. The Life History and Habits of a fish, a frog, and a rabbit; study of the Skeleton of a Rabbit; the simple facts of Respiration, Circulation, Alimentation, and Movement.

III. Elementary Mathematics

Notice to Candidates. The papers set will be sufficiently long to allow of some latitude in the questions selected and thus permit of latitude in the teaching schemes. Candidates will not be limited in the number of questions attempted, nor will they be expected to answer the whole paper. Every candidate should be provided with a ruler graduated in inches and tenths of an inch, and in centimetres and millimetres, a small set square, a protractor, compasses furnished with a hard pencil point, and a hard pencil. Squared paper will be provided when needed.
As a rule the questions set will not involve long operations or complicated numbers. The answer to money sums will generally not be required beyond the nearest penny.

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ARITHMETIC. Candidates must understand the principles of the metric system, and should be able to decimalise money readily. The use of algebraic symbols will be permitted.

The following will be excluded:

Troy and Apothecaries Measures.
Rule for finding square and cube roots. Candidates may be asked to determine the roots of numbers that can readily be expressed as the product of squares and cubes of small numbers.
True discount.
Scales of notation.
Foreign Exchanges.
Recurring decimals.
Questions on Stocks and Shares will be of a simple character and will not involve a knowledge of brokerage.


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ALGEBRA. As far as, and including simultaneous equations (one of which is linear) in two variables, L.C.M. and H.C.F. by means of factors. Problems leading to the types of equations specified.

GEOMETRY. Candidates may present for examination either of the following courses:

COURSE A. PRACTICAL GEOMETRY. The following constructions and easy extensions of them: Bisection of angles and of straight lines. Construction of perpendiculars to straight lines. Simple cases of the construction from sufficient data of triangles and of quadrilaterals. Construction of parallels to a given straight line. Construction of angles equal to a given angle. Division of straight lines into a given number of equal parts. Construction of a triangle equal in area to a given polygon. Construction of tangents to a circle. Construction of common tangents to two circles. Construction of circumscribed, inscribed, and escribed circles of a triangle.
In cases where the validity of a construction is not obvious, Candidates may be required to indicate the reasoning by which it is justified.
Candidates will be expected to be acquainted with the forms of the cube, the rectangular block, the sphere, the cylinder, and the cone.

THEORETICAL GEOMETRY. The substance of the theorems contained in Euclid, Book I, Propositions 4-6, 8, 13-16, 18, 19, 26-30, 32-41, 43, 47, 48; and. Book III, Propositions 3, 14-16, 18-22, 31. Questions upon these theorems, easy deductions from them, and arithmetical illustrations will be included.

COURSE B. The substance of Euclid, I, II, III, with simple geometrical exercises.

All Candidates, whether they select Course A or Course B, must be prepared to find numerical answers to questions upon the areas and sides of rectangles, triangles, and circles, and upon the volumes and surfaces of rectangular blocks, prisms, cones, pyramids, and cylinders.






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APPENDIX E

I

RULES FOR THE KEEPING OF ACCOUNTS IN PUPIL-TEACHER CENTRES

1. The Centre must not be conducted for private profit or for the profit of a public company, and must not be farmed out to any member of the staff.

2. A summary account of income and expenditure must be submitted annually to the Board of Education in such form as they may require. In the case of a Centre not provided by a Local Education Authority, the maintenance accounts of the Centre, together with vouchers, must be previously submitted to a qualified public accountant and auditor, and must be audited and certified correct by him.

3. Where a Centre forms part of a Secondary School, an apportionment of the expenses must be made in such a way as to satisfy the auditor and the Board.

4. The salary of each member of the staff must be separately entered in the annual statement. Where a teacher receives board and lodging in lieu of salary, an estimated amount, previously approved by the Board, may appear in the account.

5. Such part of the income of the Centre as arises from the Parliamentary Grant must not be applied to meet any rent or charge in the nature of rent or any expenditure on premises or furniture other than that for ordinary repairs, and where any such charge is included in the annual account, it must not exceed the amount of income received in that year from sources other than the Parliamentary Grant and balance in hand.

6. Rent and charges in the nature of rent may not be charged against students' fees except on the conditions stated in the following Memorandum.

II

MEMORANDUM AS TO THE APPLICATION OF STUDENTS' FEES TO PAYMENT OF RENT

1. For the purposes of this Memorandum "Rent" may be taken to include not only annual rent reserved under a lease or agreement but also -

(a) Interest payable on mortgages of the premises;
(b) Interest (at a rate not exceeding 4%) on money borrowed for the establishment and equipment of the Centre;
(c) Interest (at a rate net exceeding 4%) on capital moneys actually expended by the Managers or promoters in the establishment and equipment of the Centre.
2. The following are cases in which the Board will ordinarily and at present allow "rent" to be charged in the accounts:
(a) When the Centre is provided by a Local Education Authority;
(b) When the premises of the Centre are hired for that purpose by the Managers from a Local Education Authority and the Local Education Authority approve of such a charge;

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(c) When the Centre is conducted by the Governing Body of a University or College of University rank, or by a Committee nominated by, and responsible to such a Governing Body;
(d) When the funds and property of the Centre are held in trust solely for educational purposes. In this case only, payments made by way of sinking-fund may also be charged against students' fees.
3. Where the premises, furniture or equipment by means of which the Centre is conducted are private property or are held on trust for purposes which are not purely educational, or are hired by the Managers from an ordinary landlord, the Board will not allow income derived from students' fees to be applied so as to increase the value of the property, or so as to yield a profit to the Managers. When it is proposed in any such case to charge "rent", it must be clearly shown that such a charge is necessary to render the Centre self-supporting. The Managers will be required to give an undertaking that any balance of income after providing for the cost of maintenance shall be applied or held by them for the benefit of the students or for some other purely educational object approved by the Board.

Maintenance may be taken as including such items as rates, taxes, and ordinary repairs to buildings and replacement of furniture, but not the provision of additional buildings or furniture, and the Board reserve to themselves the discretion to disallow any item of expenditure if they think proper.

The annual accounts must be rendered in such a form as to enable the Board to satisfy themselves that the expenditure charged may properly bcd regarded as cost of maintenance.

4. Where the "rent" which it is proposed to charge is other than a rent actually payable, under a lease or tenancy agreement, to an ordinary landlord, the Board will require full particulars of the basis on which the charge is calculated, If the charge represents interest (or, in the case of premises held on trust for purely educational purposes, sinking fund), a separate capital account must be rendered annually.