1903 Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers and Students in Training Colleges

The complete document is shown in this single web page. You can scroll through it or use the following links to go to a particular section:

Part I Pupil-Teachers

Prefaratory Memorandum (page 5)
Regulations (12)
Schedules (21)

Part II Training Colleges and Hostels

Explanatory Memorandum (33)
Regulations (36)

Note

Sums of money are presented inconsistently in the original - sometimes as shillings - e.g. 40s (= 2), sometimes using and sometimes using the archaic l, which I have replaced with .

See also

The Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers for 1904, 1905 and 1906; and

Circular 523 (March 1905): Additional Grants on Account of Pupil Teachers

The text of the 1903 Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers and Students in Training Colleges was prepared by Derek Gillard and uploaded on 19 March 2024.


Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers and Students in Training Colleges
Board of Education (1903)

London: His Majesty's Stationery Office 1903
Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.


[title page]

BOARD OF EDUCATION


REGULATIONS

FOR THE

INSTRUCTION AND TRAINING

OF

PUPIL-TEACHERS


AND

STUDENTS IN TRAINING COLLEGES


Presented to both Houses of Parliament by Command of His Majesty




LONDON:
PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE
BY WYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, FETTER LANE, E.C.

And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, EAST HARDING STREET, FLEET STREET, E.C., and
32 ABINGDON STREET, WESTMINSTER, S.W.; or
OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH; or
E. PONSONBY, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN.

1903

[Cd. 1666.] Price 2½d.


[page 3]

CONTENTS

PART I

PUPIL-TEACHERS

page
PREFATORY MEMORANDUM5

Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers:
  (i) Employment of Pupil Teachers in Public Elementary Schools12
  (ii) Instruction of Pupil-Teachers in Centres14
  (iii) Instruction of Pupils in Preparatory Classes16
  (iv) Grants for Centres and Preparatory Classes17
  (v) Instruction of Pupil-Teachers otherwise than in Centres17
  (vi) Temporary Provisions as to Grants18

Schedules:
  Schedule I Examinations and Certificates recognised under Articles 9 and 1821
  Schedule II Entrance Examinations for Pupil-Teachers24
  Schedule III Articles in the Provisional Code for 1903 referring to Pupil-Teachers and Probationers28
  Schedule IV Engagements of Pupil-Teachers32

PART II

TRAINING COLLEGES AND HOSTELS

PREFATORY MEMORANDUM33
Regulations for Residential and Day Training Colleges and Hostels36




[page 5]

BOARD OF EDUCATION


PART I

PUPIL-TEACHERS

PREFATORY MEMORANDUM

These Regulations are intended to secure for the Pupil-Teacher a more complete and continuous education, and to make the period of service in an Elementary School a time of probation and training rather than of too early practice in teaching.

Pupil-Teachers, according to the Code of 1903, are boys and girls over the age of 15 years (or 14 years in rural schools) who serve in an Elementary School for not more than 20 hours each week, and receive instruction from some qualified teacher for not less than five hours each week. Where these conditions are satisfied, a grant of 40s. [2] has been paid on behalf of each Pupil-Teacher.

The new Regulations will affect the arrangements as to Pupil-Teachers in various ways. In the first place, after the usual admission of Pupil-Teachers on January 1st, 1904, the next date on which Pupil-Teachers may be admitted will be August 1st, 1904; and in 1905, and in subsequent years, Pupil-Teachers will only be admitted on August 1st.

Pupil-Teachers admitted before August 1st, 1904, will not necessarily be affected, until August 1905, by any of the restrictions of the new Regulations, whether as to age or instruction or amount of teaching-service in the Elementary School.

Pupil-Teachers admitted on and after August 1st, 1904, must not be under 16 years of age, except in rural districts, where the limit will be 15. Their instruction and the amount of service they may render in the Elementary School will only be limited by the provisions of the Code then existing.

After August 1st, 1905, Pupil-Teachers will not be permitted to serve in a Public Elementary School


[page 6]

more than half the time the school is open; and they will be required (with the one exception, explained in the next paragraph) to receive half-time instruction in an approved Pupil-Teacher Centre throughout their engagement. They may be engaged for one year or for two years, but not for three years except in rural districts.

Where long distances or defective travelling arrangements make attendance at a Pupil-Teacher Centre impossible, the Board will, before recognising any Pupil-Teacher, consider any alternative proposals submitted for his instruction. But evening classes for such instruction will not be permitted after August 1st, 1905, without the special sanction of the Board.

As has already been mentioned, an annual grant of 40s. is now paid on behalf of each Pupil-Teacher when the conditions as to school-service and instruction are satisfied. The requirements as to both of these conditions are increased under the new Regulations, and an increase of grant from 40s. to 60s. [2 to 3] is to be paid when the increased requirements are met. In all other cases the Grant will be paid at the rate of 40s., as at present.

Grants paid in respect of Pupil-Teachers attending a recognised Centre for at least half their school-time, will be paid to the Authorities of the Centre; for all other Pupil-Teachers the grants will be paid to the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education, except where the Education Act, 1902, is not in operation; in which cases they will be paid to the Managers of the Elementary Schools in which the Pupil-Teachers serve.

The separate Grants hitherto paid in respect of instruction in Science and in Art will be continued until July 31st, 1904; and Pupil-Teachers will also be eligible for grants under the Evening School Regulations up to that date. But it is probable that next year arrangements will be made for paying an Amalgamated Grant in respect of the whole course of instruction of the Pupil-Teacher. All other grants to Pupil-Teachers will then cease to be paid.

The changes described so far take no account of the Pupil-Teacher's instruction up to the age of 16. Where a Higher Elementary School or a suitable Secondary School is available it is desirable that the boys or girls who intend to become Pupil-Teachers should receive their instruction in one or other of those Schools.


[page 7]

But there will be many places where no such School is available, and where the Elementary School cannot provide the instruction required by the more intelligent candidates for Pupil-Teachership. In order to provide for such cases the new Regulations arrange for the creation of full-time Preparatory Classes, to which boys and girls who intend to become Pupil-Teachers may be admitted between the ages of 14 and 16 years. These classes are to be attached to Centres, and will provide a course of instruction extending over one or two years and leading up to the Pupil-Teacher courses. An annual grant of 2 will be paid for each Pupil in the Preparatory Classes. Such Classes may also be conducted in a Secondary School, provided that a Pupil-Teacher Centre is attached to the School, and that no grant is claimed under the Regulations for Secondary Schools in respect of Pupils in the Preparatory Classes.

After 1st August 1904, the class of very young Teachers between the ages of 13 and 16, now known as Probationers, will be discontinued. After that date all boys and girls who are intended to become Pupil-Teachers should, until they become Pupil-Teachers, spend the whole of their school-time either at a Secondary School or in the special Preparatory Classes already described. Probationers admitted before 1st August 1904 will be recognised until their time expires, subject to the provisions of the Code under which they were engaged; but no other boys or girls will be allowed, after August 1st, 1905, to serve in any capacity in a Public Elementary School, unless engaged specifically as Pupil-Teachers and under the conditions hereafter set forth as applying thenceforward to Pupil-Teachers.

The Board recognise that the new requirements, at all events in regard to Pupil-Teachers, represent no more than has been voluntarily undertaken for many years in a number of the larger cities. In these cases, and doubtless in others, it will be possible to take advantage of the whole of the Regulations and of the increased Grants without delay; and the Regulations are accordingly arranged so as to take effect, where desired, as from January 1st, 1904.

When these Regulations are fully operative - that is to say, after August 1st, 1905 - boys or girls will become Pupil-Teachers at the age of 16 (or in rural schools,


[page 8]

15), and will then, concurrently with their service in the Elementary School, receive adequate instruction for at least half their school-time at a Pupil-Teacher Centre for two years. Previous to this, from the age of about twelve to sixteen years, they would have pursued their general education uninterruptedly in some Secondary School. Where no such Secondary School is available, they will presumably have stayed at an Elementary School until the age of fourteen, and will then have been admitted to the full-time Preparatory Classes which may under these Regulations be attached to a Pupil-Teacher Centre. Thus, in places where it is impossible for a boy or girl to obtain a good education at a regular Secondary School from twelve to sixteen years of age before commencing service as a Pupil-Teacher, the Pupil-Teacher Centre itself with its Preparatory Classes will provide a four years' course of instruction, in the subjects required for matriculation at a University or, in the case of less advanced students, in the subjects of the King's Scholarship Examination: the first two of these four years being devoted entirely to the general education of the boy or girl who intends to become a Pupil-Teacher; the last two being devoted partly to general education, partly to service in an Elementary School.

With regard to the nature of the service to be rendered by the Pupil-Teacher in an Elementary School, it has already been noted that after August 1st, 1905, no boy or girl will be allowed to take any part in the management or instruction of a class until the age of 16 (or, in rural schools, 15). Even at that age it is hoped that it may become less and less the custom to make a Pupil-Teacher entirely responsible for a class, however small. The service in the Elementary School should be looked upon as a means of testing the beginner's fitness for the proposed career, and as an opportunity for giving to the learner such an acquaintance with class management and class instruction as may enable him to profit afterwards by the professional portions of the Training College course. The training of the Pupil-Teacher might possibly be more effective if the time spent in the Elementary School were a continuous period taken out of each of the two Pupil-Teacher years, and the Regulations do not prevent this arrangement. But such a plan is of the nature of an experi-


[page 9]

ment, and for its success two conditions are essential - the Pupil-Teacher must not be considered as a responsible member of the Elementary School staff, and the Elementary School must be specially adapted for the training of these young teachers.

The new Regulations are not brought into immediate effect, as it is realised that they might cause some initial difficulty in certain localities. Where the Elementary Schools are now staffed to any large extent by Pupil-Teachers, and especially where these Pupil-Teachers are at present employed in the Elementary School for a considerable portion of the school time, there will be difficulty in making up the deficiency in the Staff, caused by the reduction of the time during which Pupil-Teachers under the new Regulations may be employed in the Elementary School; and where the schools are small and scattered there will be difficulty in providing for the Pupil-Teachers accessible means of instruction of the improved character required by the new Regulations. These conditions furnish an adequate reason for not making the new system compulsory at the outset.

The Board of Education do not desire by these Regulations to enforce or even to encourage plans for educating Pupil-Teachers apart from other scholars. On the contrary, the Board would urge Local Education Authorities to arrange, by means of an adequate scholarship system or otherwise, that all the cleverest candidates for Pupil-Teacherships in their area, whether boys or girls, should receive a sound general education in a Secondary School for three or four years, with school-fellows intended for other careers, before they commence service in any capacity in an Elementary School. If, further, there is attached to the Secondary School a Pupil-Teacher Centre in organic relation with it, providing half-time instruction, the Pupil-Teacher will continue to share in some measure in the corporate life of the Secondary School even after he has commenced to give some service in the Elementary School. For some time this combination of Secondary School and Pupil-Teacher Centre may not everywhere be possible, owing to the inadequate supply of Secondary Schools which are both accessible and suitable. Moreover, there are already in existence a number of well-equipped and well-staffed Pupil-Teacher


[page 10]

Centres, the best of which have more than fulfilled the purpose for which they were originally recognised by the Board. The new Regulations should assist in developing corporate school-life in such Centres, and also in improving other less satisfactory central classes. This may be greatly facilitated by attaching to the Centres the Preparatory Classes already described, giving full-time instruction under these Regulations.

In commending these new Regulations to the attention of Local Authorities and Managers, the Board of Education desire to emphasise as strongly as possible the very great importance of taking such steps as will lead in course of time to the continuous provision, year by year, of a well-educated Teaching Staff for Elementary Schools. It cannot be denied that a considerable proportion of the many millions of public money now spent annually in our Elementary Schools fails to produce an adequate return, owing partly to the insufficient training received by many of the Teachers, and partly to the excessive employment of juvenile Teachers, who must of necessity be imperfectly educated.

Though the initial expense of providing sound general education for all young persons who are intended to become Teachers is doubtless heavy, it must be remembered that such expenditure is an essential condition to the production of adequate results from all the rest of the local or central expenditure on the schools, and is therefore the most economical of all forms of expenditure. But one of the first conditions of success must be to establish in every area some effective means for drawing candidates for the teaching profession from among the most intelligent and capable boys and girls attending the Elementary and Secondary Schools. In other words, a well-organised Scholarship system, open to the cleverest pupils from all the schools in the area, without distinction, should be the first care of every Local Education Authority. Intelligent boys and girls, both in town and in country, who from poverty or other causes would otherwise be lost to the profession, will thus be enabled to prolong their education by help of a Scholarship, supplemented (where necessary) by a maintenance bursary, either at a Secondary School or at Preparatory Classes, until the time when some service must be given in


[page 11]

the Elementary School. Even when this stage is reached, care must be taken to secure that the Pupil-Teacher's education is continued in a suitable manner, in Centres subsidised under these regulations, in order that he may be thoroughly equipped for profiting by the University or other Courses which he will pursue on entering a Training College. It has already been acknowledged that several of the larger School Boards have, in the past, taken steps in the directions above described; but, owing to the absence of the requisite legislative provisions during the past thirty years, it has often been impossible for them to extend their schemes over a sufficient number of Schools; and in the large county areas there has been no adequate organisation, with effective powers, for undertaking, on any complete scale, these supremely important educational functions. The passing of the Education Act of 1902 has removed the obstacles which have hitherto hampered educational progress in this direction; and it is earnestly hoped that the issue of these new Regulations for Pupil-Teachers, taken in connection with the new Regulations for Training College Students resident in Hostels, may enable Local Education Authorities to work out in every area an organised system for obtaining a well-educated and highly-trained teaching staff for all the Public Elementary Schools of the country.

Every effort has been made so to frame the new regulations as to leave it open to different Authorities to try experiments both as to staffing the Elementary Schools and as to methods of organising the instruction of Pupil-Teachers. To some it may seem desirable to forego every form of service in an Elementary School until the age of 17 or 18 or 20, or until after the conclusion of a Training College course, To others some form of Pupil-Teachership may seem necessary, in order to ensure regard for the practical side of teaching. Time and varied experiments can alone show how, under the manifold conditions of English education, a good teaching staff can be provided for our Elementary Schools, and the needs of the many different areas most successfully met in this important department of our educational work.

R. L. MORANT.


[page 12]

Regulations for the Instruction and Training of Pupil-Teachers

1. The sum granted by Parliament for the instruction and training of Pupil-Teachers will be administered by the Board of Education under the following regulations.

Employment of Pupil-Teachers in Public Elementary Schools

[N.B. The following Articles 2 to 10 will be fully in force by the 1st August, 1905, and will then take the place of the provisions now contained in Articles 33 to 42 of the Provisional Code for 1903. These Articles are printed in Schedule III of the present Regulations, with certain modifications which it is proposed to introduce in 1904. Between 1st January, 1904, and 1st August, 1905, the whole of Articles 2 to 10 may be adopted by agreement as regards any Pupil-Teacher, and in that event a grant will be payable under Article 24 for such Pupil-Teacher, provided that he is instructed at a Centre in accordance with Articles 11 to 19. Grants for Pupil-Teachers who are either not employed under Articles 2 to 10, or not instructed in Centres, will be paid under Article 28 in respect of the transitional period.]

2. A Pupil-Teacher is a boy or a girl receiving training in teaching in a Public Elementary School under the superintendence of the principal teacher, together with regular and suitable instruction at a Pupil-Teacher Centre or elsewhere, on condition of rendering assistance in the teaching at the Public Elementary School during some portion of the school hours.

The terms of the engagement of a Pupil-Teacher must for the present include the conditions set forth in Schedule IV. The Board will not recognise any Pupil-Teacher whose engagement does not include those conditions.

3. Pupil-Teachers must attend not less than 100 or more than 200 meetings annually in a Public Elementary School for training in the art of teaching. Registers showing the time spent by each Pupil-Teacher in this training and full records of its nature must be kept by the Head Teacher of the school.


[page 13]

4. No Pupil-Teacher may be employed in any school which is not approved by an Inspector of the Board as suitable for the purpose of training Pupil-Teachers.

5. The number of Pupil-Teachers recognised by the Board in any school must not exceed three for the principal teacher and one for each certificated assistant teacher. Pupil-Teachers, whose final examinations have been deferred, and whose engagements have consequently been extended in accordance with Article 8, will not be reckoned for the purpose of this Article.

6. Pupil-Teachers must, as a rule, be of the same sex as the principal teacher of the school in which they are engaged. Girls are not, as a rule, recognised as Pupil-Teachers in a boys' school, nor boys in a girls' or infants' school.

7. In order to be admitted as Pupil-Teachers, candidates must be approved by the Board, and must be suitable in respect of health, character, and freedom from personal defects. A certificate of health from a medical practitioner, in a form prescribed by the Board, will be required.

8. Pupil-Teachers must, except as hereinafter provided, be not less than 16 years of age at the date of their admission.

The date of admission in 1904 will be 1st January or 1st August, and in subsequent years 1st August only.

The length of the engagement will ordinarily be two years, but may be one year, provided that the end of the reduced term of service falls beyond the completion of the candidate's eighteenth year.

In rural schools candidates between the ages of 15 and 16 may, with the special consent of the Board, be admitted for an engagement of three years.

If the final examination (see Art. 18) is deferred, the engagement may be extended for not more than a year.

9. Candidates for admission as Pupil-Teachers must have passed, not more than two years previously, either (a) one of the examinations specified in Schedule I (A), or (b) a collective examination held by the Board of Education in accordance with the syllabus given in Schedule II, or (c) an examination conducted by the Local Education Authority or by the


[page 14]

managers of a Pupil-Teacher Centre, if the Board are satisfied that such examination provides adequate tests of the fitness of the candidates for their subsequent education and training.

The collective examination of the Board of Education will, as a rule, be held immediately before Whitsuntide. The Inspector will give notice to the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education (or to the managers of Public Elementary Schools in districts where the Education Act, 1902, is not in operation) as to the time and place at which the collective examination will be held. In 1904 the examination will be held on 14th May.

10. Pupil-Teachers are not required by the Board to take any examination after admission other than their final examination (see Article 18); but in each year of their course the Inspector must be satisfied that they are properly taught and diligent in their studies, and that they are properly directed and supervised during their service in the Elementary School.

The recognition of a Pupil-Teacher may be withdrawn at any time by the Board, if any of the conditions on which he was admitted cease to be fulfilled.

Instruction of Pupil-Teachers in Centres

11. Where possible, the instruction of Pupil-Teachers must be given in a Pupil-Teacher Centre recognised by the Board. A Centre may be attached to a Secondary School or a Higher Elementary School, or where circumstances make it desirable, may be separately established. A Centre must be open for at least five meetings each week during 36 or more weeks in the year. These five meetings must be held either in the morning or afternoon, and each must be of not less than two hours' duration. The Pupil-Teachers must attend with due regularity.

12. To obtain recognition by the Board a Centre must be provided either by the council of a county, borough, or urban district, or by a responsible body of Managers. Some person must be appointed to act as correspondent with the Board. Where the Education Act, 1902, is not in operation, a School Board may be recognised as the Managers of a Centre maintained by them under tho provisions of the Education Act, 1901, or of any Act renewing or extending those provisions.

13. A Centre must be efficient and necessary; must not compete unduly with any other Centre or with a neighbouring school providing higher instruction; and, from its character and financial position, must be eligible to receive aid from public funds.


[page 15]

14. A Centre must be open at all times to the inspection of the officers of the Board.

Notice must be sent to the Inspector, as soon as is possible in each case, of every date upon which the Centre will be closed or its ordinary work suspended.

15. The educational year of a Pupil-Teacher Centre must begin on the 1st of August and end on the 31st of July following.

16. The premises must be sanitary, convenient for teaching purposes, adapted to the circumstances of the Centre, and provided with satisfactory equipment and appliances.

17. The teaching staff in a Centre must be sufficient. The teachers must be approved by the Board. They must, as a rule, be paid fixed salaries, and their employment outside the Centre must not be such as will prevent the efficient discharge of their duties in the Centre.

In the case of a Centre attended mainly or entirely by girls, at least one half of the permanent staff other than the Headmaster or Headmistress must be women, but this rule will not be enforced in such a way as to require the dismissal of any teacher already employed in a Centre.

18. A timetable and a syllabus must be submitted for the approval of the Board. A copy of the timetable must be conspicuously exhibited in the Centre, and should not be modified without due notice to the Inspector. The syllabus should provide a graduated course or courses of instruction, leading up to a final examination, which may be either the King's Scholarship Examination or one of the examinations specified in Schedule I (B).

The regulations and syllabus for the King's Scholarship Examination may be obtained on application to the Secretary, Board of Education, Whitehall, London, S.W. Candidates cannot be admitted to the Examination unless application has been made to the Board of Education on their behalf before the 1st of October in the year of their examination. The examination for 1903 will be held on the 15th of December and following days. The examination for 1904 will probably be held on the 13th of December and following days, but the question of the period of the year in which the King's Scholarship Examination should be held will be subject to reconsideration.

The curriculum must always include reading and recitation, drawing, natural science, music, physical exercises, voice production, and, in the case of girls, needlework. Where a Centre is connected with a Secondary


[page 16]

School or a Higher Elementary School, proper provision must be made for the correlation of the instruction.

Registers showing the attendances of all Pupil-Teachers for instruction must be kept at the Centre in a manner approved by the Board. Systematic records of the conduct and progress of each Pupil-Teacher must also be kept.

19. (a) A scholar attending under these Regulations as a day or evening scholar at a Centre shall not be required, as a condition of being admitted into or remaining in the Centre, to attend or abstain from attending any Sunday school, place of religious worship, religious observance, or instruction in religious subjects in the Centre or elsewhere; and

(b) The times for religious worship or for any lesson on a religious subject shall be conveniently arranged for the purpose of allowing the withdrawal of any such scholar therefrom.

Instruction of Pupils in Preparatory Classes

20. Where it is shown to the satisfaction of the Board that no other facilities exist for the instruction before the age of 16 of boys or girls intending to become Pupil-Teachers, Preparatory Classes attached to a Pupil-Teacher Centre may be recognised by the Board. Such Preparatory Classes must be open for at least 10 meetings each week of not less than two hours each, either in the morning or afternoon, during 36 or more weeks in the year. The Classes must provide a suitable course of instruction during either one or two years for scholars who are intending to become Pupil-Teachers. The number of scholars attending the Preparatory Classes must not exceed by more than 50 per cent the number of Pupil-Teachers in the Centre to which the Classes are attached. In other respects the provisions of Articles 11 to 19 apply to Preparatory Classes as well as to the Centres to which they are attached.

21. Pupils receiving instruction in a Preparatory Class may not serve in any capacity in a Public Elementary School.

22. In order to be admitted to Preparatory Classes, candidates must be suitable in respect of health, character, and freedom from personal defects.


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23. Candidates must be between the ages of 14 and 16 at the date of their admission to a Preparatory Class. A declaration must be made on their behalf that they enter the Preparatory Class with the intention of eventually becoming Pupil-Teachers, and the Board must be satisfied of their fitness to be admitted and to profit by the instruction given.

Grants for Centres and Preparatory Classes

24. A grant of 3 will be paid annually to the Council or Managers by whom a Centre is provided, on account of each Pupil-Teacher employed in a Public Elementary School under Articles 2 to 10 of these Regulations, who has received instruction in the Centre for not less than 150 meetings in the year, and has attended an Elementary School for training for not less than 100 meetings nor more than 200 in that year. Not more than two grants of 3 will be paid for any Pupil-Teacher under this Article.

25. A grant of 2 will be paid annually to the Council or Managers by whom a Centre is provided, for each Pupil who has made not less than 250 attendances during the year in Preparatory Classes in connection with the Centre. Not more than 4 in all will be paid in respect of any Pupil under this Article.

26. If any of the conditions on which a grant is payable is not fulfilled, or if the instruction or management is inefficient, the Board may withhold the grant, or, if they think fit, pay the grant with or without deductions, giving a warning that a grant will not again be paid under similar circumstances.

27. Grants are intended to supplement and not to supersede local effort, and must be expended to the satisfaction of the Board. An account of the income and expenditure of every Centre must be furnished annually to the Board.

Instruction of Pupil-Teachers otherwise than in Centres

28. (i) Where Pupil-Teachers are not employed under Articles 2 to 10 of these Regulations, or where, in the case of Pupil-Teachers so employed, it is shown to the satisfaction of the Board that it is impossible to provide classes for their instruction, which will fully satisfy the


[page 18]

conditions above laid down, the Board will accept the best arrangements possible under the circumstances.

But in such cases, after August 1st, 1905:

(1) No instruction may as a rule be given to Pupil-Teachers before 7.30 a.m. or after 6 p.m.

(2) Pupil-Teachers must not teach in an Elementary School for more than 200 meetings of the school during a year, and at least 300 hours should be spent by them under instruction or in private study.

(ii) Where a girl is engaged as a Pupil-Teacher in a school under a master, and receives instruction from him out of school hours, some respectable woman must invariably be present during the whole time that such instruction is being given.

(iii) For every Pupil-Teacher satisfactorily instructed under this Article a grant of 2 annually will be paid to the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education (or, where the Education Act, 1902, is not yet in operation, to the managers of the Elementary School in which the Pupil-Teacher is employed).

(iv) The number of grants paid for any Pupil-Teacher under this Article will not exceed the number of years for which he was originally admitted.

General

29. No grants will be made under these Regulations for any boy or girl on whose account a grant is claimed from the Board in respect of the same period for a Secondary School or for a Higher Elementary School.

Temporary Provisions as to Grants

30. Grants in respect of Pupil-Teachers admitted from the 1st January, 1900, or from any earlier date, will be paid on the conditions stated in Article 102 of the Code for 1902.

31. The following grants will be made for Pupil-Teachers admitted from the 1st July, 1900, or from any later date up to 1st July, 1903, provided that


[page 19]

the Inspector reports in each case that the Pupil-Teacher is properly taught and diligent in his studies:

(1) Where the school year of a school ends between 1st April, 1903, and 1st July, 1903, a grant of 2 for each Pupil-Teacher recognised on the staff of the school on the last day of the school year.

(2) Where the school year ends between 1st July, 1903, and 1st January, 1904, a grant at the following rate for each Pupil-Teacher recognised on the staff of the school at the end of the school year:

(a) Where the Pupil-Teacher was admitted from the 1st January in any year, at the rate of 2.

(b) Where the Pupil-Teacher was admitted from the 1st July in any year, at the rate of 1.

(3) Where the school year ends between 1st January 1904, and 1st July, 1904, a grant at the rate of 1 for each Pupil-Teacher admitted from 1st July of any year and recognised on the staff of the school on 31st December, 1903.
The above grants of 2 and of 1 are in respect of the year ending on 30th June, 1903, or 31st December, 1903, and of the half-year ending on 31st December, 1903, respectively; and are in lieu of any grant that would have been payable under Article 102 of the Provisional Code for 1903.

32. Grants under the two preceding articles will be paid, either to the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education, or, where the Education Act, 1902, is not yet in operation, to the Managers of the Public Elementary School in which the Pupil-Teacher is engaged; and may, when the incidence of the appointed day under the Education Act, 1902, renders it necessary, be apportioned between the Local Education Authority for Elementary Education and the Managers of the School in which the Pupil-Teacher is engaged.

33. The first complete grants under Articles 24, 25 and 28 will be for the year commencing 1st August,


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1904, but proportionate grants will be paid under Articles 24 and 28 for the seven months from 1st January, 1904, to 31st July, 1904, in respect of Pupil-Teachers recognised during that period.

Any such proportionate grant paid under Article 24 in respect of a Pupil-Teacher admitted from 1st July of any year will not be counted in considering the maximum number of grants payable under that Article in respect of the Pupil-Teacher.

34. In the case of a Pupil Teacher admitted from 1st January of any year, for a term of years ending after 31st December 1903, a proportionate grant will be payable under Article 24 or 28 for the five months immediately preceding the termination of his original engagement.

35. The total period in respect of which grants are paid for any Pupil-Teacher, including any grants paid under the Codes of 1903 or previous years, shall not exceed by more than one month the number of years for which the Pupil-Teacher was originally admitted.

36. Grants will continue to be payable in respect of Pupil-Teachers under the Regulations of the Board of Education for Science and Art Classes and for Evening Schools until 31st July, 1904; but after that date such payments will probably be discontinued and an amalgamated grant paid in respect of the Pupil-Teacher's course as a whole.




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SCHEDULE I

EXAMINATIONS RECOGNISED FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES

A

The following examinations are recognised by the Board under Article 9:

1. The Oxford Local Examination for Junior Students.

2. The Cambridge Local Examination for Junior Students.

3. The Examination for Second Class Certificates of the College of Preceptors.

4. The Junior Certificate Examination of the Central Welsh Board.

B

The following Examinations are recognised by the Board under Article 18:

1. The Higher Certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools Examination Board (provided that the candidate has passed in English or history).

2. The London University Matriculation Examination.

3. The Victoria University Preliminary Examination.

4. The Birmingham University Matriculation Examination.

5. The University of Wales Matriculation Examination.

6. The Durham University Examination for certificates of proficiency in General Education (provided


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that the candidate has passed in History or Geography).

7. The Examination for the Vice-Chancellor's Certificate of the Oxford University Extension.

8. The Cambridge University Extension Examination for certificates of affiliation to the University.

9. The Cambridge University Examination for the Vice-Chancellor's Certificate of Systematic Study, including the Examination in Mathematics and Language.

10. The Oxford University Higher Local Examination.

11. The Cambridge University Higher Local Examination.

12. The Oxford University Local Examination for Senior Students (provided that English is included among the groups in which the candidate has passed).

13. The Cambridge University Local Examination for Senior Students (provided that English is included among the groups in which the candidate has passed).

14. The Durham University Local Examination for Senior Students (provided that (1) English, including either Literature or History, and (2) Euclid or Algebra are among the subjects in which the candidate has passed).

15. The College of Preceptors' Examination for the Diploma of Associate.

16. The First Class Certificate of the College of Preceptors (provided that the candidate has passed in (1) English History or Geography, and (2) Euclid or Algebra).

17. The Senior Certificate Examination of the Central Welsh Board (provided that the candidate has passed in (1) Elementary Mathematics, and (2) English Literature or History).

18. The Leaving Certificate Examination of the Scotch Education Department, provided that a Higher Grade Certificate is obtained in at least three subjects (of which one must be English, including History and


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Geography, one Mathematics, or, for girls, Higher Arithmetic, or Lower Mathematics with Higher Arithmetic, and one an ancient or modern foreign language).

*19. The Edinburgh University Local Examination for Senior Certificate.

*20. The Aberdeen University Local Examination for Senior Certificate.

*21. The Aberdeen Higher Certificate for Women.

*22. The St. Andrew's L.L.A. Examination for Women.

*Provided that, in each of the examinations 19-22 above, the certificate obtained includes a pass in at least three subjects, of which one must be English (including History and Geography), one Mathematics, or, for women Higher Arithmetic, and one an ancient or modern foreign language.
23. The Royal University of Ireland Matriculation Examination.

24. The Trinity College Dublin Matriculation Examination.

25. The Trinity College Dublin Examination for Women for Certificates of Dublin University.

26. The London University School-leaving Certificate Examination.

27. (For Teachers in Infants' Schools or Classes only.) (a) The examination for the Elementary or Higher Certificate of the National Froebel Union. (b) The 1st class Certificate of the Manchester Kindergarten Association.

N.B. Other Examinations may be recognised from time to time by the Board for the purposes of Articles 9 and 18 if the Board are satisfied that they provide adequate tests of the fitness of the candidates for their subsequent education and training.


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SCHEDULE II

CERTIFICATES AND EXAMINATIONS OF CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION AS PUPIL-TEACHERS

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SCHEDULE III

[The following Articles, 33 to 42, are taken from the Provisional Code for 1903. The notes in brackets show the nature of the changes which the Board propose gradually to introduce in these provisions. On and after 1st August, 1905, these Articles will be replaced by Articles 2 to 10 of the Regulations to which this Schedule is appended.]

33. Boys or girls over 13 and under 16 years of age and exempt from legal obligation to attend school may be recognised as probationers, provided that they are approved by the Inspector, and are employed with the intention that they shall subsequently enter into engagements as Pupil-Teachers in the school.

Probationers are not permitted to serve in school during more than half the time that the school is open; and they must receive suitable instruction during the term of their employment.

Certificates of health and character, and, in the case of girls, of proficiency in needlework, must be furnished for probationers proposed for recognition under this Article.

[It is proposed to discontinue the recognition of new Probationers under this Article as from 1st August, 1904; but Probationers already recognised under the Provisional Code for 1903 or previous Codes will continue to be recognised until the date at which their recognition would cease in the ordinary course.]

34. A Pupil-Teacher is a boy or girl engaged to serve in a Public Elementary School during some portion of the school hours under the superintendence of the principal teacher, on condition of receiving suitable instruction. The Board may decline to recognise any Pupil-Teachers where they consider that this condition is not satisfied.

The terms of the engagement of a Pupil-Teacher must include the conditions set forth in Schedule VI. The Board will not recognise any Pupil-Teacher whose engagement does not include those conditions.

[Schedule VI of the Provisional Code for 1903 is reprinted as Schedule IV of these Regulations. ]

35. Candidates, in order to be engaged as Pupil-Teachers, must be presented to the Inspector for


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approval, and must pass the examination specified in Schedule V, or some other examination recognised by the Board for the purpose of this Article (see Schedule IV A). The certificates specified in Schedule V must also be furnished.

[Schedule IV (A) of the Provisional Code for 1903 is reprinted as Schedule I (A) of these Regulations, and Schedule V. of the Provisional Cede for 1903 is reprinted as Schedule II of these Regulations.]

36. Central classes for the instruction of Pupil-Teachers must be open at all times to the inspection of the Board, and the Board must be satisfied with the premises and general arrangements. The names of all Teachers employed in such classes must be notified to the Board, and the timetable must be approved by the Inspector.

Central classes will not be recognised for the purpose of Article 63 or of the Elementary School Teachers Superannuation Rules, 1899, unless five meetings of not less than two hours each are held in the morning or afternoon in each week.

Pupil-Teachers may receive their instruction in Secondary Schools, under conditions approved by the Board.

37. Pupil-Teachers and Probationers must, as a rule, be of the same sex as the principal teacher of the school in which they are engaged.

Where a girl is engaged as a Pupil-Teacher or Probationer in a school under a master, and receives instruction from him out of school hours, some respectable woman must invariably be present during the whole time that such instruction is being given.

Girls are not, as a rule, recognised as Pupil-Teachers or Probationers in a boys' school, nor boys in a girls' or infants' school.

38. The engagement of a Pupil-Teacher can only begin on the 1st of July, or on the 1st of January. One of these dates must be uniformly adopted for all Pupil-Teachers in the same school.

[After the 1st January, 1904, it is proposed that Pupil-Teachers shall only be admitted from 1st August in any year.]

39. (a) Pupil-Teachers must be, except as hereinafter provided, not less than 15 years of age at the beginning of their engagement.


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(b.) In rural schools candidates between the ages of 14 and 15 may, with the special consent of the Inspector, be admitted for an engagement of four years. In such cases the candidates will be required before admission to pass an examination in the three elementary subjects up to and including Standard VII and in the elements of Grammar, Geography, and History. Certificates of health and character, and, in the case of girls, of proficiency in needlework, must be furnished for candidates proposed for admission as Pupil-Teachers under this Article.

[On and after the 1st August, 1904, it is proposed that the minimum age of admission shall be ordinarily 16 years, or, in rural schools, with the special consent of the Board, 15 years.]

40. The length of the engagement will ordinarily be three years, but may be two, or one, provided that (a) the candidate passes the examination prescribed by Schedule V for such shorter engagement, and (b) the end of the reduced term of service falls beyond the completion of the candidate's eighteenth year.

Candidates may be admitted for an engagement of one or more years, provided that (a) they have passed not more than two years previously an examination recognised by the Board (see Schedule IV A), and (b) the end of the engagement falls beyond the completion of the candidate's 18th year.

[It is proposed that, in the case of Pupil-Teachers admitted on and after the 1st August, 1904, the length of engagement shall ordinarily be two years, but may be three years for candidates admitted under the age of 16 in rural schools.]

41. (a) Pupil-Teachers are not required to take any examination after admission other than that prescribed by Article 41(f), but in each year of their engagement the Inspector must be satisfied that they are properly taught and diligent in their studies, and certificates of good conduct must be produced.

(b) If the Inspector's report or the certificates are not satisfactory, the recognition of the Pupil-Teacher may cease from the end of the month in which the decision of the Board is announced.

(c) [Cancelled.]

(d) The collective examination of candidates is held in the Spring.


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In 1903 the examination will be on 4th April.

(e) The Inspector will give notice of the time and place at which the collective examination will be held.

Notice should, in accordance with Article 46, be given to the Board of the names of Pupil-Teachers who will attend the King's Scholarship Examination.

(f) The final examination of Pupil-Teachers will (unless some other examination recognised by the Board under Schedule IV B is taken) be the King's Scholarship Examination next preceding the termination of their engagements. The King's Scholarship Examination may be deferred for a year if the engagement is extended under paragraph 2(b) of Schedule VI.

42. The number of Pupil-Teachers recognised by the Board must not exceed three for the principal Teacher and one for each certificated Assistant Teacher.

For the purposes of this Article a probationer is reckoned as equivalent to a Pupil-Teacher.

Pupil-Teachers whose engagements have been extended under Section 2(b) of Schedule VI will not be reckoned as Pupil-Teachers for the purposes of this Article.




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SCHEDULE IV

CLAUSES REQUIRED IN ALL ENGAGEMENTS 0F PUPIL TEACHERS

1. The Pupil-Teacher shall serve in School under the Head Teacher during some portion of the usual School hours, but not for more than five hours on any one day, nor for more than 20 hours in any one week. Sunday is expressly excluded from the engagement.

2. The engagement shall begin on the first day of ______19__ and shall end on the last day of ______19__ : provided that

(a) the engagement shall determine, if the Pupil-Teacher enters a Training College as a King's Scholar before the last mentioned date;

(b) the engagement may by mutual consent be extended for one year if the Pupil-Teacher defers the final examination under Article 41(f) of the Code.

3. The Pupil-Teacher shall receive throughout the engagement, from a certificated Teacher or other qualified Teacher approved by the Board, special instruction in the subjects required for the final examination prescribed under Article 41(f) of the Code. Such instruction shall be given for at least five hours in each week, but not more than three hours on any one day on which the Pupil-Teacher serves in the School.




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Part II Training Colleges and Hostels

EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM

The Board of Education have decided that the time has come when additional facilities should be provided for the training of teachers in public elementary schools. They have accordingly issued the following regulations, in which it will be noticed that two important changes are made in the administration of the present Training College system:

In the first place the Exchequer grants in respect of the training of Day students will, where such students reside in properly constituted and approved Hostels, be on the same scale as the grants made in respect of Residential students; and, in the second place, it has been decided to abolish for the future what is known as the 75 per cent limit of grant hitherto applied in the case of Residential Colleges. This limit has had but small practical effect in these Colleges, and its application to the grants for students in Day Training Colleges would be attended with considerable administrative difficulties.

The effect of these changes is that grants equal in amount to those hitherto paid in respect of students residing in Residential Colleges, will in future be paid in respect of all students in training, except Day students not residing in Hostels. New Hostels may be established and will receive grants on the same scale if they satisfy the requirements of the Board.

Under the new Regulations it will be open to any


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Local Education Authority, or to any approved Committee, to conduct a Hostel in which students shall be boarded and lodged in a suitable manner while obtaining their education and professional training at a Day or a Residential College as hitherto. Inasmuch as the main object of the changes now made is to secure to as many Training College students as possible a share in a healthy corporate student-life, the Board will require that a Hostel should be so constituted as to provide the necessary conditions for such a life, and that the Head of the Hostel should possess the qualification and experience necessary to promote the ends for which the Hostel exists.

Now that local education authorities are established for every large or populous area, it is hoped that facilities for the training of Teachers for Public Elementary Schools will be greatly increased. It is anticipated that Local Education Authorities will unite in fostering this development (a) by making subsidies to existing Day or Residential Colleges in return for additional accommodation or in return for the right to nominations to free places in such Colleges, or (b) by establishing a Scholarship system by which the cleverest Pupil-Teachers in their area may proceed to particular Training Colleges, or (c) by themselves providing Hostels or Training Colleges. It will be possible to create a scheme of local Scholarships open to all the ablest Pupil-Teachers and Assistant-Teachers in the areas of Local Education Authorities who combine for this purpose, by which free places shall be allotted at local Colleges or Hostels; and the scheme may be still further extended by the establishment of Travelling and Maintenance Scholarships tenable at selected places outside the areas of the Authorities. When an examination, conducted by a local University, is accepted by the Board of Education as alternative to the King's Scholarship Examination, it may with advantage be utilised for the purpose of such a scholarship scheme.

In this manner Local Authorities will be enabled to secure a proper return for the rest of their educational


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expenditure, and to provide fully qualified teachers for the staffing of all the Public Elementary Schools within their area. It is in the hope of facilitating these developments that the following regulations are issued by the Board.

R. L. MORANT.





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REGULATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL AND DAY TRAINING COLLEGES AND HOSTELS

NOTE. As the following arrangements are merely provisional it has been considered advisable to adhere to the numbering of the Articles as in the Code for 1903.

111. (a) A Training College is an institution either for boarding, lodging, and instructing, or for merely instructing students who are preparing to become certificated teachers in Public Elementary Schools. The former are called Residential, the latter Day Training Colleges.

(b) A Residential College may receive day students. Training Colleges are required to include, either on their premises or within a convenient distance, a practising school in which the students may learn the practical exercise of their profession.

(c) A Hostel is an institution for boarding and lodging students attending a recognised Training College. The conditions qualifying for recognition as a Hostel are specified in Article 113(b) below.

(d) Training Colleges and Hostels must be open at all reasonable times to the inspection of His Majesty's Inspectors.

(e) An institution for boarding, lodging, and instructing blind students who are preparing to become teachers in schools for the blind may be recognised as a Training College. Grants will be paid to such a College on the same conditions, so far as circumstances permit, as those laid down for an ordinary Residential Training College.

112. A Day Training College must be attached to some University or College of University rank. The authorities of a Day Training College must be a local committee, who will be held responsible for the discipline and moral supervision of the students, for their regular attendance at professorial or other lectures, and for due care as regards the board and lodging of those students who do not reside in Hostels.

113. No grant is made -

(a) to a Training College unless the Board are satisfied with the premises, management, staff, curriculum, and general arrangements, and recognise it as a Training College; or

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(b) to a Hostel unless it satisfies the following conditions:
(i) The Hostel must have a responsible Head approved by the Board of Education.

(ii) Tho Hostel must be in a suitable position, and the premises, management and general arrangements must satisfy the Board.

(iii) Suitable provision must be made in the Hostel for not less than 10 students, who may or may not be students at a Training College.

(iv) No charge must be made to the students by the Hostel, unless previously approved by the Board.

(v) A full statement showing the general arrangements, timetable, dietary, charges to students, and fees payable in respect of the students to the Training Colleges attended by them, must be submitted to the Board annually before 1st September.

(vi) There must be a responsible Committee of Managers. This Committee need not be identical with the Committee of the College or Colleges which the students attend.

The authorities of a Training College or Hostel shall present such accounts and returns as the Board may require.

ADMISSION TO TRAINING COLLEGES

114. The recognised students in a Training College are called King's Scholars.

115. The authorities of any Training College may, with or without any further examination, admit the following persons as students:

(a) Any candidate who has obtained a place in the first or second class at the last or the last but one preceding King's Scholarship Examination;

(b) Any certificated teacher who has not previously been trained during two years, and who wishes to enter the College for a year's training;


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(c) Any Graduate, or person qualified by examination to become a Graduate, in Arts or Science of any University in the British Empire recognised by the Board for the purposes of this Article, who wishes to enter the College for a year's training;

(d) Any candidate over 18 years of age who has passed since the 1st January, 1901, one of the examinations approved by the Board for this purpose (see Schedule IV D of the Code of 1903).

The Board may limit in the case of any Training College the number of candidates admitted under each paragraph of this Article.

116. The number of Day Students to be admitted to each Training College will be fixed by the Board upon receipt of an application from the authorities of such College dated not later than the 1st of June in each year, and stating the number of students that they desire to admit.

117. Before candidates are admitted -

(a) The medical officer of the College must certify that the state of their health is satisfactory, and that they are free from serious bodily defect or deformity; and

(b) They must sign a declaration that they intend bonâ-fide to adopt and follow the profession of teacher in a Public Elementary School, or in a School certified under the provisions of the Elementary Education (Blind and Deaf Children) Act, 1893, or in a Central Class for Pupil-teachers, or in a Training College, or in the Army or Navy, or (within Great Britain) in Poor Law Schools, Certified Industrial or Day Industrial Schools, or Certified Reformatories.

118. The Board may refuse to recognise in a Training College any student who has subsequently to the publication of the result of the King's- Scholarship Examination signed an engagement to enter another


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Training College, without the written consent of the authorities of the latter College. In other respects the authorities of each College settle their own terms of admission.

119. Upon proof by the authorities of any College that candidates have not fulfilled the conditions signed by them on admission into the College, the Board may refuse to grant parchment certificates to such candidates, or to recognise them as Certificated Teachers.

120. The period of training is ordinarily two years, except for students admitted under Article 115(b) or (c). But an additional year's training may be allowed on the application of the authorities responsible for the training of the student. The consent of the Board will only be given in the case of students of special merit, for whom special educational facilities are offered. The additional year's training may, with the like application and consent, be taken, in whole or in part, elsewhere than at the College; and grants will then be paid, as the case may be, to the College, to the College and the Hostel, or to the College and the student, of the same amounts as if the student were taking his training in that year at the College.

Students of special merit may on the application of the authorities of their Training College, and with the consent of the Board, be allowed to take their second year of training, in whole or in part, in an institution for training teachers of the deaf approved by the Board for the purpose.

Students who pass successfully through two or three years of training receive special mention thereof on their certificates.

For the purposes of this Article the period from January to June 1895 is counted as one year.

EXAMINATION OF STUDENTS IN TRAINING COLLEGES

121. King's Scholars who are qualified to attend the Certificate Examination are required to attend that examination, unless prevented by illness or other cause approved by the Board.


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122. Grants are placed to the credit:

(a) of each Residential College of 100 for every master, and of 70 for every mistress, who, having been trained in such College as a resident King's Scholar, and of 20 for every master and every mistress who, having been trained in such College as a day King's Scholar, during two years, is recognised as a Certificated Teacher, and completes the prescribed period of probation and obtains a parchment Certificate (Article 63).

(b) of each Hostel of 80 for every master, and of 50 for every mistress, who, having been trained in a Training College as a King's Scholar, and having been resident in such Hostel during two years, is recognised as a Certificated Teacher, and completes the prescribed period of probation and obtains a parchment Certificate (Article 63).

An additional grant of half of each of the above amounts is placed to the credit of the College or Hostel on account of each such master or mistress who has received an additional year's training under Article 120.

123. Teachers who have been trained for one year only may, if they satisfy the requirements of Article 60, obtain parchment Certificates after probation, or may be reported by the proper Department, upon the same terms as others; and grants, of half the amounts specified in Article 122, may be placed to the credit of the College in which they were trained, or Hostel in which they were resident, as the case may be, provided they entered as King's Scholars for one year's training under Article 115(b) or Article 115(c) of the Code for 1903 or the corresponding Article of any previous Code.

124. (a) Grants are paid in respect of King's Scholars:

(i) to Residential Colleges, in respect of resident students and day students;

(ii) to Day Colleges, in respect of day students;

(iii) to Hostels, in respect of day students resident in the Hostels.


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(b) Grants are also paid through the authorities of Residential and Day Colleges to King's Scholars who are day students and are not resident in Hostels.

(c) The Grants are for the year ending 31st July.

125. Subject (as regards Residential Colleges and Hostels) to the limitation imposed by the next Article, the Annual Grants are as follows:

(a) For each King's Scholar in residence in a Residential College for continuous training throughout the year, a Grant of 50 (men) or 35 (women) to the College.

Where a King's Scholar has for any sufficient reason been unable to be in residence for the whole session, a proportionate Grant may be made on his or her account.

(b) For each day student enrolled as a King's Scholar in a Residential or Day Training College for continuous training throughout the year:

(i) a Grant of 10 to the College;

(ii) where the student is resident in a Hostel, a Grant of 40 (men) or 25 (women) to the Hostel;

(iii) where the student is not resident in a Hostel, a Grant of 25 (men) or 20 (women) to the student, this Grant being paid through the authorities of the College.

126. (a) The Annual Grants to a Residential College or a Hostel are paid out of the sums placed to its credit (Articles 122, 123); and the Annual Grant for each year is limited by the balance standing to the credit of the College or Hostel at the beginning of that year, after adjustment in respect of Grants for previous years.

(b) This article does not come into operation, as regards any College or Hostel, until after the College or Hostel has been recognised for five years.

(c) An enlargement of a College or Hostel may, with the approval of the Board, be treated as a new College or Hostel.


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127. The annual grant is paid by instalments, as follows, subject to the submission of such lists of King's Scholars as may be required, and subject also, as regards Residential Colleges and Hostels, to the limitations imposed by Article 126.

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128. In addition to the annual grants, separate grants for Drawing and Science are made at the following rates to Training Colleges for every King's Scholar who has satisfactorily passed through all approved course in -

(a) Drawing, 10s.;

(b) Mathematics or Theoretical Mechanics, 25s.;

(c) Any other Science subject, including General Elementary Science when taken with another Science subject, 35s.;

(d) General Elementary Science only, and no other Science subject, from 35s. to 55s. according to the report of the Inspector upon the Science equipment of the College, upon the facilities provided for adequate scientific instruction, upon the amount and character of the practical work of the students in the course, and upon the quality of the scientific instruction given.

Grants will not be made under (b) and (c) of this Article in respect of the instruction of any King's Scholar in more than two subjects.

129. The following Table shows the amounts of the grants which, in consequence of the change made in 1895 in the date of the Certificate Examination, are


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placed to the credit of Residential Colleges instead of those specified in Articles 122 and 123, in the case of students -

(a) whose first or second year of training included the period from January to June, 1895,

(b) whose third year (Art. 120) or single year (Art. 115(b)) of training consisted of the same period.

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